Report: Man dies after blood-type mixup

January 22, 2008

Authorities are investigating the death of a man who apparently received a transfusion of the wrong blood type at a Florida hospital, it was reported Tuesday.

The Bert Fish Medical Center in New Smyrna Beach has turned over records to state investigators who are looking into the death of Blake Oliver.

Oliver, 67, died following surgery when he apparently received his roommate's type A blood rather than the type O he was supposed to get, WJXT-TV in Jacksonville reported.

Oliver was from New Mexico and was in Florida to visit his brother.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: A hiccup in gene therapy progress?

Related Stories

A hiccup in gene therapy progress?

March 30, 2018
Zebrafish, roundworms, fruit flies, mice, rats, rabbits, dogs, cats, pigs, and monkeys provide steppingstones to clinical trials to evaluate new treatments for people. The value of animal studies continues, even after a new ...

Many patients show signs of chronic kidney disease before diabetes diagnosis

March 14, 2018
Many patients who will later be diagnosed with diabetes show signs of chronic kidney disease (CKD) even before their diabetes diagnosis, according to a study by researchers with the University of Tennessee Health Science ...

New research discovers genetic defect linked to African Americans with heart failure

March 7, 2018
Heart failure is more common, develops earlier and results in higher rates of illness and death in African Americans than in whites.

Soluble antibodies play immune suppressive role in tumor progression

April 12, 2018
Wistar researchers have found that soluble antibodies promote tumor progression by inducing accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in pre-clinical cancer models. Results were published online in Cancer Immunology ...

Infections could trigger stroke in pregnant women during hospital delivery

April 20, 2018
Pregnant women who have an infection when they enter the hospital for delivery might be at higher risk of having a stroke during their stay, according to new research.

Transplanted livers help body defend against organ rejection, study finds

April 18, 2018
For decades, transplant experts have observed that liver transplant recipients often need less anti-rejection medication, known as immunosuppressive drugs, than recipients of other solid organs. Similarly, when patients receive ...

Recommended for you

Best of Last Year—The top Medical Xpress articles of 2017

December 20, 2017
It was a good year for medical research as a team at the German center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Magdeburg, found that dancing can reverse the signs of aging in the brain. Any exercise helps, the team found, but dancing ...

Pickled in 'cognac', Chopin's heart gives up its secrets

November 26, 2017
The heart of Frederic Chopin, among the world's most cherished musical virtuosos, may finally have given up the cause of his untimely death.

Sugar industry withheld evidence of sucrose's health effects nearly 50 years ago

November 21, 2017
A U.S. sugar industry trade group appears to have pulled the plug on a study that was producing animal evidence linking sucrose to disease nearly 50 years ago, researchers argue in a paper publishing on November 21 in the ...

Female researchers pay more attention to sex and gender in medicine

November 7, 2017
When women participate in a medical research paper, that research is more likely to take into account the differences between the way men and women react to diseases and treatments, according to a new study by Stanford researchers.

Drug therapy from lethal bacteria could reduce kidney transplant rejection

August 3, 2017
An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 25, 2017
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.