Report: Man dies after blood-type mixup

January 22, 2008

Authorities are investigating the death of a man who apparently received a transfusion of the wrong blood type at a Florida hospital, it was reported Tuesday.

The Bert Fish Medical Center in New Smyrna Beach has turned over records to state investigators who are looking into the death of Blake Oliver.

Oliver, 67, died following surgery when he apparently received his roommate's type A blood rather than the type O he was supposed to get, WJXT-TV in Jacksonville reported.

Oliver was from New Mexico and was in Florida to visit his brother.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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