Claim: Wet sand causes digestion problems

January 31, 2008

Wet sand could pose a health risk for beach goers, researchers at the University of Florida said.

In a study published in the Marine Pollution Bulletin, researchers said people who stay in water and wet sand have a higher probability of having gastrointestinal problems than those who spend time on dry sand farther away from the water, the St. Petersburg (Fla.) Times reported Wednesday.

Sea gull feces and other fecal-thriving organisms could contaminate beach sand, which is not routinely checked for fecal levels the way shore line waters are, the study showed.

The study was conducted by veterinary expert Tonya D. Bonilla, who reportedly examined three beaches in South Florida during a two-year period.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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3 comments

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HeRoze
not rated yet Jan 31, 2008
Something else to worry about... not. Seriously, I can't beleive they resisted the urge to post numbers on the 'alarmingly high' amount of fecal matter. Sea birds crap near the sea, and always have. This logic applies to many over-hyped issues, as well.
DGBEACH
not rated yet Jan 31, 2008
...and what about the fecal matter from the fish...:)
Daryl
not rated yet Aug 11, 2009
wow

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