FDA asked to drop soy health claims

February 19, 2008

A non-profit nutrition education organization has asked the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to drop heart disease health claims for soy protein.

The Weston Price Foundation submitted a petition to the agency Tuesday in response to the FDA's request for public comment on the issue. Manufacturers have been able to market soy as a "heart healthy" food since 1999.

"We have filed this petition because there was never a sound basis for a soy health claim and the heavy marketing of soy as a 'miracle food' has put American men, women and children at risk," said Kaayla Daniel, lead author of the 65-page petition that was officially filed by Sally Fallon, president of the foundation.

The organization, with headquarters in Washington, claims soy protein products aren't safe and have no long history of use in the food supply. The organization also claims the evidence on soy protein and heart disease is "contradictory and inconsistent, and no standard of scientific agreement has been met."

In addition, the foundation notes the American Heart Association in 2006 advised physicians that soy has little effect on cholesterol and is unlikely to prevent heart disease.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: FDA moves to ax claim for heart benefits from soy foods

Related Stories

FDA moves to ax claim for heart benefits from soy foods

October 30, 2017
U.S. regulators want to remove a health claim about the heart benefits of soy from cartons of soy milk, tofu and other foods, saying the latest scientific evidence no longer shows a clear connection.

How beneficial polyphenols truly are?

June 25, 2013
Scientifically proving the health benefits of polyphenols, particularly in reducing cardiovascular disease risks, can only be useful when taking into account how they fit in the body's complexity.

Which health messages work? Experts prefer negative ones, but the public follows positive ones

January 29, 2015
Is it better to be positive or negative? Many of the most vivid public health appeals have been negative - "Smoking Kills" or "Drive, Drive, and Die" - but do these negative messages work when it comes to changing eating ...

What science doesn't know about menopause

December 15, 2015
My physio, a young woman called Lucy, was simply making conversation. She wanted to distract me from the serious discomfort she was about to inflict by massaging the nerves around my painful posterior tibial tendon, an ankle ...

Vegetable oil IS good for you, researcher says

June 7, 2013
A typical American consumes approximately 3 or more tablespoons of vegetable oil each day. Vegetable oils, like those from soy, corn and canola, are a significant source of calories and are rich in linoleic acid (LA), which ...

Researchers investigating the many ways we get by with a little help from trillions of our bacterial friends

September 20, 2013
Everyone's got a personal collection of microbiota. You could think of yours as your unique internal pet—at up to 3 percent of your body mass, it's as hefty as a teacup Yorkie or a large guinea pig—requiring care and ...

Recommended for you

Best of Last Year—The top Medical Xpress articles of 2017

December 20, 2017
It was a good year for medical research as a team at the German center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Magdeburg, found that dancing can reverse the signs of aging in the brain. Any exercise helps, the team found, but dancing ...

Pickled in 'cognac', Chopin's heart gives up its secrets

November 26, 2017
The heart of Frederic Chopin, among the world's most cherished musical virtuosos, may finally have given up the cause of his untimely death.

Sugar industry withheld evidence of sucrose's health effects nearly 50 years ago

November 21, 2017
A U.S. sugar industry trade group appears to have pulled the plug on a study that was producing animal evidence linking sucrose to disease nearly 50 years ago, researchers argue in a paper publishing on November 21 in the ...

Female researchers pay more attention to sex and gender in medicine

November 7, 2017
When women participate in a medical research paper, that research is more likely to take into account the differences between the way men and women react to diseases and treatments, according to a new study by Stanford researchers.

Drug therapy from lethal bacteria could reduce kidney transplant rejection

August 3, 2017
An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 25, 2017
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.