Measles spread on Hawaiian Airlines flight

February 14, 2008

Health officials are trying to find about 250 people who may have been exposed to measles on a flight from California to Hawaii.

The San Diego Union-Tribune said Hawaiian Airlines flight 15 from San Diego to Hawaii last Saturday included a infant who contracted the illness in a San Diego medical clinic. The child is being treated on a military base in Hawaii.

Dr. Wilma Wooten, San Diego County's public health officer, said officials are most concerned about children who have not been immunized.

The outbreak began when a 7-year-old returned to San Diego from a family vacation in Switzerland Jan. 15 infected with measles, the newspaper said. The 7-year-old set off a chain reaction that has infected two siblings and at least one classmate.

San Diego County health officials said they've confirmed measles in five patients and investigating five suspected cases.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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