Seniors struggle with chronic pain

A Canadian survey found that more than one-quarter of seniors living at home and 38 percent of those in institutions suffered from chronic pain.

Data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey showed that chronic pain affected 27 percent of seniors living in households, compared with 16 percent of people ages 18 to 64, Statistics Canada said in a release.

For the household population with severe pain, 53 percent stated that it interfered with most activities. Among institutional residents in severe pain, 64 percent reported major activity interference.

Seniors who experienced an increase in pain over a two-year period had greater odds of being unhappy, regardless of illness or other factors that would contribute to unhappiness, the report said.

Chronic pain among seniors in private households was more common than diabetes, heart disease and Alzheimer's disease. In institutions, only incontinence, arthritis and Alzheimer's disease were more common.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International


Explore further

Diabetes tops common conditions for frequent geriatric emergency patients

Citation: Seniors struggle with chronic pain (2008, February 22) retrieved 27 May 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2008-02-seniors-struggle-chronic-pain.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more