Healthcare quality tracking gains traction

March 28, 2008

A survey said U.S. adults are gaining confidence in the fairness and reliability of healthcare quality assessments.

The Wall Street Journal Online/Harris Interactive Health-Care Poll said most adults favor the use of patient satisfaction surveys to determine healthcare quality above all other quality measures. More than half of those surveyed said it is also fair to measure healthcare quality based on the use of electronic medical records.

The survey said 87 percent of people were interested in using Web-based consumer ratings tools, suggesting that an initiative to allow consumers to rate their doctors could be highly successful.

"These findings suggest that as quality measurement in health care becomes more readily available to consumers and they become more familiar with these measures that trust in the process will increase," Katherine Binns of Harris Interactive said in a statement. "At the end of the day, however, its feedback from their peers --other patients-- that matters most to consumers."

The online survey of 2,015 U.S. adults was conducted last month for the Wall Street Journal Online's Health Industry Edition.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: New diabetes self-management education course for South Asian population

Related Stories

New diabetes self-management education course for South Asian population

November 17, 2017
Researchers at King's College London have signed an agreement with three partner organisations to offer a customised type 2 diabetes self-management education programme for the South Asian population in three London Boroughs.

The psychological impact of incontinence

November 16, 2017
We rarely hear or speak about incontinence. But the condition – the involuntary loss of urine or faecal matter – is frighteningly common.

Online education tool helps teens with juvenile arthritis improve quality of life

November 5, 2017
An internet-based health education and self-management program that offers monthly calls with health coaches improved health-related quality of life for participating teens with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, according to ...

African Americans live shorter lives due to heart disease and stroke

October 23, 2017
The average lifespan of African Americans is significantly shorter than white Americans, mostly because of heart disease and stroke, which contributed to more than two million years of life lost among African Americans between ...

Study of heart stents for stable angina highlights potential of placebo effect

November 2, 2017
Coronary artery stents are lifesaving for heart attack patients, but new research suggests that the placebo effect may be larger than previously thought.

Quantifying Medicaid participation rates among low-income seniors has huge implications

November 10, 2017
Medicare and Medicaid—the federal programs that provide health coverage for more than 100 million Americans—cost $1 trillion annually. That number could, in fact, end up being much higher, because not everyone eligible ...

Recommended for you

Female researchers pay more attention to sex and gender in medicine

November 7, 2017
When women participate in a medical research paper, that research is more likely to take into account the differences between the way men and women react to diseases and treatments, according to a new study by Stanford researchers.

Drug therapy from lethal bacteria could reduce kidney transplant rejection

August 3, 2017
An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 25, 2017
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate ...

Team eradicates hepatitis C in 10 patients following lifesaving transplants from infected donors

April 30, 2017
Ten patients at Penn Medicine have been cured of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) following lifesaving kidney transplants from deceased donors who were infected with the disease. The findings point to new strategies for increasing ...

'bench to bedside to bench': Scientists call for closer basic-clinical collaborations

March 24, 2017
In the era of genome sequencing, it's time to update the old "bench-to-bedside" shorthand for how basic research discoveries inform clinical practice, researchers from The Jackson Laboratory (JAX), National Human Genome Research ...

The ethics of tracking athletes' biometric data

January 18, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—Whether it is a FitBit or a heart rate monitor, biometric technologies have become household devices. Professional sports leagues use some of the most technologically advanced biodata tracking systems to ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.