Aerobic exercise can increase mental fitness in older people

April 16, 2008

Aerobic physical exercises that aim to improve cardiovascular fitness also help boost how fast you can think, manual dexterity and how well you can concentrate on visual and auditory tasks, concludes a Cochrane Review.

This conclusion was drawn after Cochrane Researchers identified 11 studies that examined the effects of getting healthy people over the age of 55 to take on additional physical exercise. In these studies, participants showed an increase in at least one aspect of cognitive function.

“This benefit adds to the other known benefits of aerobic exercise,” says lead researcher Maaike Angevaren, who works in the Research Group Lifestyle and Health at the University of Applied Sciences, in Utrecht, Netherlands.

“Larger studies are still required to confirm whether the aerobic training component is necessary, or whether the same can be achieved with any type of physical exercise,” says Angevaren.

Source: Wiley

Explore further: Teens need vigorous physical activity and fitness to cut heart risk

Related Stories

Teens need vigorous physical activity and fitness to cut heart risk

January 31, 2018
Guidelines for teenagers should stress the importance of vigorous physical activity and fitness to cut the risk of heart disease, new research suggests.

Before-school physical activity program helps improve body weight and overall wellness

February 12, 2018
Children participating in a 12-week, before-school physical activity program experienced improvement in body weight and social/emotional wellness, compared with their classmates who did not participate. Investigators from ...

Walk in groups to keep exercise goals on track

January 29, 2018
People may be more likely to stick to taking exercise if they walk in groups, according to a paper published in the International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care.

Cognitive training helps regain a younger-working brain

January 23, 2018
Relentless cognitive decline as we age is worrisome, and it is widely thought to be an unavoidable negative aspect of normal aging. Researchers at the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas, however, ...

New meta-analysis: Recreational football is broad-spectrum medicine

January 24, 2018
It is now well-established that physical fitness and resting heart rate are a strong mortality predictors and that exercise training is a cornerstone in the non-pharmacological prevention and treatment of lifestyle diseases ...

Fitness in childhood linked to healthy lungs in adulthood

February 1, 2018
Children who are fitter and whose fitness improves during childhood and adolescence have better lung function as young adults, according to a large study published in the European Respiratory Journal.

Recommended for you

Smartphones are bad for some teens, not all

February 21, 2018
Is the next generation better or worse off because of smartphones? The answer is complex and research shows it largely depends on their lives offline.

Tackling health problems in the young is crucial for their children's future

February 21, 2018
A child's growth and development is affected by the health and lifestyles of their parents before pregnancy - even going back to adolescence - according to a new study by researchers at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, ...

Lead and other toxic metals found in e-cigarette 'vapors': study

February 21, 2018
Significant amounts of toxic metals, including lead, leak from some e-cigarette heating coils and are present in the aerosols inhaled by users, according to a study from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public ...

Why teens need up to 10 hours' sleep

February 21, 2018
Technology, other distractions and staying up late make is difficult, but researchers say teenagers need to make time for 8-10 hours of sleep a night to optimise their performance and maintain good health and wellbeing.

Electronic health records don't reduce administrative costs

February 21, 2018
The federal government thought that adopting certified electronic health record systems (EHR) would reduce administrative costs for physicians in a variety of specialties. However, a major new study conducted by researchers ...

Low-fat or low-carb? It's a draw, study finds

February 20, 2018
New evidence from a study at the Stanford University School of Medicine might dismay those who have chosen sides in the low-fat versus low-carb diet debate.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.