Cancer fund promotes breastfeeding benefit

April 29, 2008

Three-quarters of British women are unaware that breastfeeding can protect against cancer, a survey by the World Cancer Research Fund indicated.

The group said 25 percent of women surveyed were aware that breastfeeding reduces a woman's cancer risk and only one-third knew breastfed children are less likely to be overweight, which increases cancer risk.

The WCRF recommends that mothers breastfeed exclusively for six months and then continue with complementary feeding after that.

"It is a real concern that so many women are unaware that breastfeeding can help prevent cancer," Lucie Galice of WCRF said in a statement. "This means that many new mothers are making choices about whether to breastfeed without knowing it can help reduce cancer risk for both them and their child."

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: Thirty-year study shows women who breastfeed for six months or more reduce their diabetes risk

Related Stories

Thirty-year study shows women who breastfeed for six months or more reduce their diabetes risk

January 16, 2018
In a long-term national study, breastfeeding for six months or longer cuts the risk of developing type 2 diabetes nearly in half for women throughout their childbearing years, according to new Kaiser Permanente research published ...

Early breastfeeding success not affected by epidural pain relief with fentanyl

November 8, 2017
Including the opioid fentanyl in the solution used to maintain an epidural during childbirth does not appear to affect the success of breastfeeding six weeks after delivery, according to a study published in Anesthesiology, ...

In nonsmoking women, breastfeeding for more than six months may protect against breast cancer

August 15, 2013
A new analysis has found that breastfeeding for more than six months may safeguard nonsmoking mothers against breast cancer. The same does not seem to hold true for smoking mothers, though. Published early online in the Journal ...

Study shows breastfeeding, birth control may reduce ovarian cancer risk in women with BRCA mutations

May 14, 2014
Breastfeeding, tubal ligation – also known as having one's "tubes tied" – and oral contraceptives may lower the risk of ovarian cancer for some women with BRCA gene mutations, according to a comprehensive analysis from ...

History of breastfeeding associated with reduced risk of breast cancer recurrence

April 28, 2015
Women diagnosed with breast cancer who previously breastfed their babies had a 30 percent overall decreased risk of the disease recurring, according to a new Kaiser Permanente study published in the Journal of the National ...

Study shows association between breastfeeding and reduced risk of aggressive breast cancer

October 28, 2015
A large international study shows that breastfeeding is associated with a lower risk of developing an aggressive form of breast cancer called hormone-receptor negative. This new combined evidence shows the risk was reduced ...

Recommended for you

Placental accumulation of flame retardant chemical alters serotonin production in rats

January 22, 2018
A North Carolina State University-led research team has shown a connection between exposure to a widely used flame retardant chemical mixture and disruption of normal placental function in rats, leading to altered production ...

Marijuana use does not lower chances of getting pregnant

January 22, 2018
Marijuana use—by either men or women—does not appear to lower a couple's chances of getting pregnant, according to a new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers.

Americans are getting more sleep

January 19, 2018
Although more than one in three Americans still don't get enough sleep, a new analysis shows first signs of success in the fight for more shut eye. According to data from 181,335 respondents aged 15 and older who participated ...

Wine is good for you—to a point

January 18, 2018
The Mediterranean diet has become synonymous with healthy eating, but there's one thing in it that stands out: It's cool to drink wine.

Sleep better, lose weight?

January 17, 2018
(HealthDay)—Sleeplessness could cost you when it's time to stand on your bathroom scale, a new British study suggests.

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.