Swedish tobacco tied to premature death

April 20, 2008

A form of moist Swedish tobacco known as snus has been linked to premature death in users, a new longitudinal study has found.

Dr. Ann Roosaar at the Odontological Institute said the study found snus -- it rhymes with moose -- posed a significant health risk to those who used it even when compared to normal tobacco, the Swedish news agency TT reported Saturday.

"Even if smoking is without question a much greater threat to health than snus our research rejects the view that the use of Swedish snus is in principle without risk," the researcher said.

The study examined the use of snus in the Swedish municipalities of Enkoping and Habo during a 30-year period, along with residents' use of other tobacco products and alcohol.

Snus is generally used by placing a pinch of it inside the mouth under the upper lip. Inhabitants' mouths were examined prior to the study and its final results indicated that snus users were more likely to have mouth and throat cancers than non-snus users, the news agency said.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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