Black and south Asian people benefiting less from interventions to reduce blood pressure, says study

November 10, 2008

People from black and south Asian communities in the UK are not benefiting as much as white people from doctors' interventions to reduce their blood pressure, according to a new study published today in the journal Annals of Family Medicine.

The study looked at the treatment of over 8,800 people with high blood pressure, visiting 16 family doctor practices across Wandsworth in southwest London in 2005. It was carried out by researchers from Imperial College London and Wandsworth Primary Care Trust.

The study found that in spite of considerable efforts to improve the treatment of high blood pressure in the UK, including new performance-related pay measures for doctors, differences in management between white, black and south Asian patients have persisted.

It is known that black populations in the UK are more likely to suffer from high blood pressure than other groups. Managing patients with high blood pressure is important because they are at a high risk of developing a range of health problems including heart attacks, strokes and diabetes.

In the new study, black patients previously diagnosed with high blood pressure were significantly less likely to achieve an established target for their blood pressure than white or south Asian patients.

White patients who had high blood pressure and also two or more cardiovascular problems showed significantly improved blood pressure control, but the same improvement was not seen in black or south Asian patients. This finding is of particular concern because these patients are likely to have the greatest health risk, say the researchers.

South Asian patients with poorly controlled high blood pressure were prescribed fewer blood pressure lowering medications than their black or white peers.

Dr Christopher Millett, the lead author of the study from the Division of Epidemiology, Public Health & Primary Care at Imperial College London, said: "It is worrying that differences in blood pressure control between ethnic groups have persisted, particularly in high risk patients, in spite of doctors focusing a lot of effort on this area of patients' health.

"There are a number of potential reasons for the differences in blood pressure control found between white, black and south Asian groups. These include differences in how doctors treat these patients, differences in patient adherence to therapy, and biological differences in the response to antihypertensive therapy. However, further research is required to better understand the reasons for these differences," added Dr Millett.

These findings highlight the importance of ensuring that hypertension is closely monitored and appropriately treated in black and south Asian patients, especially in those with existing cardiovascular conditions, say the researchers.

Source: Imperial College London

Explore further: Suicidal thoughts rapidly reduced with ketamine, finds study

Related Stories

Suicidal thoughts rapidly reduced with ketamine, finds study

December 14, 2017
Ketamine was significantly more effective than a commonly used sedative in reducing suicidal thoughts in depressed patients, according to researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). They also found that ketamine's ...

Sepsis is the leading cause of death in Brazilian ICUs, with 55.7 percent mortality rate

December 14, 2017
Brazil has an extremely high rate of mortality from sepsis in intensive care units (ICUs), surpassing even mortality due to stroke and heart attack in ICUs. According to a survey conducted by researchers at the Federal University ...

Hispanics born outside U.S. more likely to die from cardiovascular diseases

December 14, 2017
Hispanics born abroad who now live in the United States have higher odds of dying from cardiovascular diseases than U.S.-born Hispanics, a new study shows.

Holiday treats, hectic schedules may increase risk of heart attack

December 8, 2017
Between the ubiquitous goody trays, unending to-do lists and stressful travel itineraries, it can be tough to stay on track when it comes to health during the holiday season, whether it's sticking to a diet or maintaining ...

LDL cholesterol found to be the main modifiable predictor of atherosclerosis in individuals with no risk factor

December 11, 2017
LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), known as 'bad' cholesterol, is the underlying reason why many apparently healthy individuals have heart attacks or strokes during middle age despite not having cardiovascular risk factors such as ...

Centralized population health coordinators improve care for patients with chronic disease

December 12, 2017
A centralized chronic disease management program produced significant improvements in the care of patients with diabetes, hypertension or cardiovascular disease treated at practices in the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) ...

Recommended for you

Drug found that induces apoptosis in myofibroblasts reducing fibrosis in scleroderma

December 15, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—An international team of researchers has found that the drug navitoclax can induce apoptosis (self-destruction) in myofibroblasts in mice, reducing the spread of fibrosis in scleroderma. In their paper ...

How defeating THOR could bring a hammer down on cancer

December 14, 2017
It turns out Thor, the Norse god of thunder and the Marvel superhero, has special powers when it comes to cancer too.

Researchers track muscle stem cell dynamics in response to injury and aging

December 14, 2017
A new study led by researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) describes the biology behind why muscle stem cells respond differently to aging or injury. The findings, published in Cell Stem Cell, ...

'Human chronobiome' study informs timing of drug delivery, precision medicine approaches

December 13, 2017
Symptoms and efficacy of medications—and indeed, many aspects of the human body itself—vary by time of day. Physicians tell patients to take their statins at bedtime because the related liver enzymes are more active during ...

Study confirms link between the number of older brothers and increased odds of being homosexual

December 12, 2017
Groundbreaking research led by a team from Brock University has further confirmed that sexual orientation for men is likely determined in the womb.

Potassium is critical to circadian rhythms in human red blood cells

December 12, 2017
An innovative new study from the University of Surrey and Cambridge's MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, published in the prestigious journal Nature Communications, has uncovered the secrets of the circadian rhythms in ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.