What is the effect of fluoxetine on mast cell?

December 23, 2008,

Mast cells are now recognized as "granular cells of the connective tissue", whose activation exacerbates allergic immune responses and as key players in the establishment of innate immunity as well as modulators of adaptive immune responses. The role of mast cells in the gastrointestinal mucosa is not only to react to antigens, but also to actively regulate the barrier and transport properties of the intestinal epithelium.

In clinical studies, it has become clear that psychological factors, especially anxiety and depression, play an important role in gastrointestinal diseases by precipitating exacerbation of symptoms. Fluoxetine hydrochloride (fluoxetine) is a kind of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which belong to a class of antidepressants used in the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders.

The research team led by He-Shen Luo, from the Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University of China, investigated the effects of fluoxetine on mast cell morphology and rMCP-1 expression in gastric antrum in a rat model of depression. This will be published on December 7, 2008 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology.

A Sprague-Dawley rat model of chronic stress-induced depression was established. Fifty experimental rats were randomly divided into the five groups: normal control group, fluoxetine + normal control group, depressed model group, saline + depressed model group, and fluoxetine + depressed model group. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) immunofluorecence and RT-PCR techniques were used to investigate rMCP-1 expression in gastric antrum. Mast cell morphology was observed under transmission electron microscopy.

They found that depression induced mast cell proliferation, activation, and granule hyperplasia. Compared with the normal control group, the average immunofluorescence intensity of gastric antrum rMCP-1 significantly increased in depressed model group (37.4 ± 7.7 vs 24.5 ± 5.6, P < 0.01) or saline + depressed model group (39.9 ± 5.0 vs 24.5 ± 5.6, P < 0.01), while there was no significant difference between fluoxetine + normal control group (23.1 ± 3.4) or fluoxetine + depressed model group (26.1 ± 3.6) and normal control group. The average level of rMCP-1mRNA of gastric antrum significantly increased in depressed model group (0.759 ± 0.357 vs 0.476 ± 0.029, P < 0.01) or saline + depressed model group (0.781 ± 0.451 vs 0.476 ± 0.029, P < 0.01 ), while no significant difference was found between fluoxetine + normal control group(0.460 ± 0.027) or fluoxetine + depressed model group (0.488 ± 0.030) and normal control group. Fluoxetine showed partial inhibitive effects on mast cell ultrastructural alterations and de-regulated rMCP-1 expression in gastric antrum of the depressed rat model.

These findings will conduce to understand that chronic heterotypic stress may induce the immune responses in gastric mucosa. Treatment with fluoxetine can ameliorate pathological changes in gastric antrum of depressed rat model, suggesting that SSRIs are an effective therapeutic agent for some gastroduodenal diseases caused by psychological factors.

Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology

Explore further: Yin and yang of serotonin neurons in mood regulation

Related Stories

Yin and yang of serotonin neurons in mood regulation

November 19, 2015
Low levels of serotonin in the brain are known to play a role in depression and anxiety, and it is customary to treat these disorders with medications that increase the amount of this neurotransmitter. However, a new study ...

Depressed fish could help in the search for new drug treatments

August 5, 2013
Chronic stress can lead to depression and anxiety in humans. Scientists working with Herwig Baier, Director at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried, recently discovered a very similar correlation in fish.

Why don't antidepressants work in some patients? Mouse study shows it may be down to your environment

September 20, 2016
SSRI antidepressants (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, the best known being Prozactm) are amongst the most commonly taken medicines. However, there seems to be no way of knowing in advance whether or not SSRIs will ...

Strategy found for safely prescribing antidepressants to children and adolescents

May 5, 2015
A multidisciplinary team of Johns Hopkins researchers has developed two new strategies to treat depression in young people using the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) class of medications. These strategies, published ...

Common antidepressant may hold the key to heart failure reversal

March 4, 2015
A team led by researchers at Temple University School of Medicine (TUSM) found that a commonly prescribed antidepressant restored heart function in mice with heart failure, a finding that could lead to clinical trials for ...

Could antidepressants help reduce the risk of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy?

February 9, 2012
A groundbreaking study published in Elsevier's Epilepsy & Behavior provides evidence in mouse model that drugs known as Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs; one category of antidepressants) may reduce the risk ...

Recommended for you

Human 'chimeric' cells restore crucial protein in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

March 16, 2018
Cells made by fusing a normal human muscle cell with a muscle cell from a person with Duchenne muscular dystrophy —a rare but fatal form of muscular dystrophy—were able to significantly improve muscle function when implanted ...

Team develops 3-D tissue model of a developing human heart

March 16, 2018
The heart is the first organ to develop in the womb and the first cause of concern for many parents.

Democratizing science: Researchers make neuroscience experiments easier to share, reproduce

March 16, 2018
Over the past few years, scientists have faced a problem: They often cannot reproduce the results of experiments done by themselves or their peers.

Genetic variant discovery to help asthma sufferers

March 16, 2018
Research from the University of Liverpool, published today in Lancet Respiratory Medicine, identifies a genetic variant that could improve the safety and effectiveness of corticosteroids, drugs that are used to treat a range ...

Researchers say use of artificial intelligence in medicine raises ethical questions

March 15, 2018
In a perspective piece, Stanford researchers discuss the ethical implications of using machine-learning tools in making health care decisions for patients.

Study identifies potential drug for treatment of debilitating inherited neurological disease

March 15, 2018
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have demonstrated in mouse studies that the neurological disease spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) can be successfully treated with drugs. The finding paves the way for ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

not rated yet Dec 24, 2008
good info, but now we need to know if other drugs can have similar affect. Like for example, the newer drug milnacipran.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.