Regular sprints boost metabolism

January 28, 2009

A regular high-intensity, three-minute workout has a significant effect on the body’s ability to process sugars. Research published in the open access journal BMC Endocrine Disorders shows that a brief but intense exercise session every couple of days may be the best way to cut the risk of diabetes.

Professor James Timmons worked with a team of researchers from Heriot-Watt University Edinburgh, Scotland, to investigate the effect of ‘high-intensity interval training’ (HIT) on the metabolic prowess of sixteen sedentary male volunteers. He said, “The risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type two diabetes is substantially reduced through regular physical activity. Unfortunately, many people feel they simply don’t have the time to follow current exercise guidelines. What we have found is that doing a few intense muscle exercises, each lasting only about 30 seconds, dramatically improves your metabolism in just two weeks."

Current exercise guidelines suggest that people should perform moderate to vigorous aerobic and resistance exercise for several hours per week. While these guidelines are very worthwhile in principle, Timmons suggests that a lack of compliance indicates the need for an alternative, “Current guidelines, with regards to designing exercise regimes to yield the best health outcomes, may not be optimal and certainly require further discussion. The low volume, high intensity training utilized in our study substantially improved both insulin action and glucose clearance in otherwise sedentary young males and this indicates that we do not yet fully appreciate the traditional connection between exercise and diabetes”.

The subjects in this trial used exercise bikes to perform a quick sprint at their highest possible intensity. In principle, however, any highly vigorous activity carried out a few days per week should achieve the same protective metabolic improvements. Timmons added, “This novel approach may help people to lead a healthier life, improve the future health of the population and save the health service millions of pounds simply by making it easier for people to find the time to exercise”.

Reference: Extremely short duration high intensity training substantially improves insulin action in young healthy males, John A Babraj, Niels BJ Vollaard, Cameron Keast, Fergus M Guppy, Greg Cottrell and James A Timmons, BMC Endocrine Disorders (in press) www.biomedcentral.com/bmcendocrdisord/

Source: BioMed Central

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6 comments

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fufter
5 / 5 (1) Jan 28, 2009
[quote]any highly vigorous activity carried out a few days per week should achieve the same protective metabolic improvements[/quote]

does masturbation count?
Chey
4 / 5 (1) Jan 28, 2009
Dirk Pearson's and Sandy Shaw's book "Life Extension" from 1982 basically stated the same about exercise intensity. That book and their ideas are still cutting edge.
h0dges
not rated yet Jan 28, 2009
lmao fufter! probably
Fogy
not rated yet Jan 28, 2009
@fufter

No wonder I'm so thin!
KBK
5 / 5 (1) Jan 28, 2009
The trick is to induce a WHOLE SYSTEM metabolic limit approach, or go to the body's overall whole metabolic limit..like a stretching exercise of sorts, but for the system as a whole.

This expands the regular or daily metabolic 'area' or 'level' or, more importantly, the 'range' of metabolic activity that the body can spontaneously utilize on a minute to minute basis in daily life.

THAT is the critical point which then leads to more invigorating work being easily achievable for the body on a daily basis--and thus more likely that the given person will find themselves indulging in slightly harder work in a spontaneous fashion, which then delivers the desired health benefits.

This trick allows the body to 'crack open' the door of a more vigorous lifestyle with no complaints or issues, and thus a longer, healthier, and more active life.

It reverses the downward spiral trend of where a sedentary life leads to being more sedentary.

Meaning: Ya Gotta Start Somewhere!
grahf
not rated yet Jan 28, 2009
fufter:

Only if you do it while running from police.

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