Study reviews health risks, economic burden of migraine

February 2, 2009

A new study published in Value in Health reviews the economic burden of migraine in the U.S. and recent clinical findings of the health risks of this neurological condition. This study traces the history of economic articles published on migraine using the PubMed MEDLINE database and archival searches of relevant articles to identify possible health risks associated with migraines that warrant further study.

Migraine affects millions of individuals worldwide. Sufferers experience substantial decreases in functioning and productivity, results which in turn translate into diminished quality of life for individuals, financial burdens for health care systems and substantial lost work time that impacts individuals, employers, and societies alike. Migraine is a condition most prevalent in individuals between the ages of 25 and 55, generally the most productive years of a person's life.

Migraine is often perceived as a condition that imposes a minimal burden on society and the health care system. This misperception persists in part because the disorder is episodic and rarely causes long-term physical disability. Because it is under-diagnosed and under-treated, analyses of claims data underestimate the condition's prevalence and economic impact.

Recent clinical studies suggest that migraine may be a progressive disease with cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and long-term neurologic effects. Suffering from migraines may also be a risk factor for brain lesions. Additionally, studies following those who suffer from migraine with aura (sensory, motor or visual disturbances that can precede or accompany the headache) have shown these individuals to be twice as likely as the general population to develop major cardiovascular disease and suffer stroke. If such findings are confirmed, treatments, approaches and economic evaluations of migraine treatment may require major reconsideration.

Epidemiologic studies have recently indicated that 4 percent to 5 percent of the general population suffers from chronic daily migraine headache, a condition characterized by 15 or more headache days per month, and that transformed migraine—the transformation of episodic migraine to the chronic form of the disorder—accounts for approximately half of these patients.

Citation: www3.interscience.wiley.com/jo … l/121358266/abstract

Source: Wiley

Explore further: Reducing dependency on opioid painkillers in rural and regional Australia

Related Stories

Reducing dependency on opioid painkillers in rural and regional Australia

August 10, 2017
Between 2008 and 2011, the rate of people treated for dependency on morphine in rural and regional Australia was roughly double that of their major city counterparts.

What happens to your body when you're stressed

August 7, 2017
We all feel stressed from time to time – it's all part of the emotional ups and downs of life. Stress has many sources, it can come from our environment, from our bodies, or our own thoughts and how we view the world around ...

GPs' heart disease prediction tool narrows search for at-risk patients

May 24, 2017
A prediction tool that allows GPs to spot patients most at risk from heart disease and stroke before illness strikes is now more accurate than ever before, a study from the University of Nottingham has shown.

Burden of physical health conditions linked to increased risk of suicide

June 12, 2017
Suicide continues to be a major driver of mortality in the United States. Each year, more than 45,000 people die by suicide and in the past 15 years, the suicide mortality rate has risen by an alarming 24%. A new study in ...

Study identifies potential health care 'double jeopardy' for minority patients

June 6, 2017
A new study sheds light on the depth of health care disparities faced by minority populations in the United States. The findings suggest a possible "double jeopardy" for black and Hispanic patients: Not only has it been shown ...

Acupuncture relieves pain in emergency patients: study

June 19, 2017
The world's largest randomised controlled trial of the use of acupuncture in emergency departments has found the treatment is a safe and effective alternative to pain-relieving drugs for some patients.

Recommended for you

Americans misinformed about smoking

August 22, 2017
After voluminous research studies, numerous lawsuits and millions of deaths linked to cigarettes, it might seem likely that Americans now properly understand the risks of smoking.

Women who sexually abuse children are just as harmful to their victims as male abusers

August 21, 2017
"That she might seduce a helpless child into sexplay is unthinkable, and even if she did so, what harm can be done without a penis?"

To reduce postoperative pain, consider sleep—and caffeine

August 18, 2017
Sleep is essential for good mental and physical health, and chronic insufficient sleep increases the risk for several chronic health problems.

Despite benefits, half of parents against later school start times

August 18, 2017
Leading pediatrics and sleep associations agree: Teens shouldn't start school so early.

Doctors exploring how to prescribe income security

August 18, 2017
Physicians at St. Michael's Hospital are studying how full-time income support workers hired by health-care clinics can help vulnerable patients or those living in poverty improve their finances and their health.

Schoolchildren who use e-cigarettes are more likely to try tobacco

August 17, 2017
Vaping - or the use of e-cigarettes - is widely accepted as a safer option for people who are already smoking.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.