CDC, states: US swine flu cases jump to 68

April 28, 2009 By MIKE STOBBE , AP Medical Writer
A worker at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention sits at a station in the emergency operations center as the CDC monitors swine flu development Monday April 27, 2009, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Amis)

(AP) -- The number of confirmed swine flu cases in the United States has jumped to 64, federal officials said Tuesday, and states reported at least four more.

The U.S. said the new count includes "a number of hospitalizations." CDC officials had previously said just one person had been hospitalized.

The CDC said there were 17 new cases in New York City, four more in Texas and three additional cases in California. That brings the total numbers of cases confirmed by federal officials to 45 in New York City, 10 in California, six in Texas, two in Kansas and one in Ohio.

State health officials in California have confirmed three other cases, and Indiana authorities have confirmed one.

The increase is not surprising. For days, CDC officials have said they expected to see more confirmed cases - and more severe illnesses. Health officials across the country have stepped up efforts to look for cases, especially among people with flu-like illness who had traveled to .

CDC officials also warned that updates in the number of confirmed cases would at time be disjointed, as different states announce new information before the CDC's national count is updated.

--

On the Net:

CDC Web page: http://www.cdc.gov/swineflu/

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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freethinking
1 / 5 (3) Apr 28, 2009
One big serous question, why is it being called the swine flu instead of the Mexican Flu? Isn't it normal to call the flu from the nation it originated from, ie. the asian flu, the spanish flue, etc. Are we just being politically correct here?

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