Rosiglitazone does not harm bone healing if combined with metformin in rats

June 11, 2009

Taking the diabetes medications metformin and rosiglitazone together reverses the adverse effects on bone of rosiglitazone treatment alone in an experimental model, according to a new study done in rats.

Both metformin and rosiglitazone are widely used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and the , said lead author Claudia Sedlinsky, MD, of GIOMM - La Plata National University, La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Recent research, however, shows that rosiglitazone decreases bone mineral density in healthy humans and appears to increase fractures in women with , compared with those receiving metformin or another medication.

Previously, Sedlinsky's group reported that metformin helps grow bone cells in laboratory cultures. They wanted to find out if metformin could have beneficial effects on bone healing in an animal model and to compare it with rosiglitazone.

Sedlinsky and her colleagues tested four groups of rats that had a small hole in a bone. One group of rats received only metformin in their drinking water, a second group got only rosiglitazone, a third group received both medications and the last group—the controls—received plain water with no drug (placebo). After 30 days of treatment, the researchers removed the injured bone from the animals and studied it for evidence of new bone formation.

As expected, metformin increased bone healing and rosiglitazone decreased bone healing compared with placebo (no treatment). However, in the rats that received combined treatment, metformin completely reversed the ability of rosiglitazone to inhibit new bone formation, the authors found. Bone healing was similar to that observed in control rats.

Further investigations are needed to know whether these results can translate to humans, Sedlinsky stressed.

"This important finding may lead to further investigations about how to treat patients with anti-diabetic drugs while avoiding potential harm to their bones," she said.

Source: The Endocrine Society (news : web)

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Scientists find key to regenerating blood vessels

November 23, 2017
A new study led by researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) identifies a signaling pathway that is essential for angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels. The ...

Researchers find infectious prions in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patient skin

November 22, 2017
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)—the human equivalent of mad cow disease—is caused by rogue, misfolded protein aggregates termed prions, which are infectious and cause fatal damages in the patient's brain. CJD patients ...

Surprising roles for muscle in tissue regeneration, study finds

November 22, 2017
A team of researchers at Whitehead has illuminated an important role for different subtypes of muscle cells in orchestrating the process of tissue regeneration. In a paper published in the November 22 issue of Nature, they ...

Study reveals new mechanisms of cell death in neurodegenerative disorders

November 22, 2017
Researchers at King's College London have discovered new mechanisms of cell death, which may be involved in debilitating neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

Cinnamon turns up the heat on fat cells

November 21, 2017
New research from the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute has determined how a common holiday spice—cinnamon—might be enlisted in the fight against obesity.

How rogue immune cells cross the blood-brain barrier to cause multiple sclerosis

November 21, 2017
Drug designers working on therapeutics against multiple sclerosis should focus on blocking two distinct ways rogue immune cells attack healthy neurons, according to a new study in the journal Cell Reports.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.