Drinking 22 or more units of alcohol a week increases rates of hospital admission

July 1, 2009,
Drinking 22 or more units of alcohol a week increases rates of hospital admission

(PhysOrg.com) -- Men who drink 22 or more units of alcohol a week have a 20% higher rate of admissions into acute care hospitals than non-drinkers, researchers from the University of Glasgow have found.

The study also showed that drinking between eight and 14 units of a week increases the total number of days spent in hospital.

The research saw almost 6,000 working men, aged 35 to 64 during the early 1970s, from West and Central Scotland undergo a comprehensive screen to check for underlying and potential health problems and questions about their weekly .

This was categorised as none; 1 to 7 units; 8 to 14; 15 to 21; 22 to 34; and 35 or more. Twenty one units is the government’s recommended maximum weekly amount of alcohol for men.

The participants’ health was then tracked for around 28 years, using national hospital activity data, focusing on heart and , stroke and alcohol related illness/conditions.

The results showed that men drinking over 22 units a week had a 20% higher rate of admissions into acute care hospitals than non-drinkers. But relatively low levels of alcohol consumption also gave rise to a higher number of bed days.

Drinkers of eight or more weekly units spent longer in hospital than non-drinkers, with length of stay progressively increasing the higher the weekly consumption. Those drinking the most chalked up a 58% higher use of beds.

The number of admissions for , and more time spent in hospital as a result, started with a weekly tally of 15 units, and progressively increased the more weekly units were consumed.

Those downing 22 or more weekly units had more admissions for respiratory illness, but they had the lowest rates of admission for . Non-drinkers had the highest rates of admission for this.

Men drinking 22 or more units a week had more admissions for a mental health problem, but non-drinkers had a higher rate of admissions for mental ill health than those who drank between one and 14 units a week.

Dr Carole Hart, Research Fellow in Public Health and Health Policy at the University of Glasgow, said: “This research illustrates the long-term impact that alcohol can have on health and health services and reinforces the case for moderation when it comes to alcohol consumption.”

The authors conclude that drink has a “notable effect” on health service use and therefore overall costs to the NHS. Their report is published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Provided by University of Glasgow

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Smartphones are bad for some teens, not all

February 21, 2018
Is the next generation better or worse off because of smartphones? The answer is complex and research shows it largely depends on their lives offline.

Lead and other toxic metals found in e-cigarette 'vapors': study

February 21, 2018
Significant amounts of toxic metals, including lead, leak from some e-cigarette heating coils and are present in the aerosols inhaled by users, according to a study from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public ...

Tackling health problems in the young is crucial for their children's future

February 21, 2018
A child's growth and development is affected by the health and lifestyles of their parents before pregnancy - even going back to adolescence - according to a new study by researchers at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, ...

Why teens need up to 10 hours' sleep

February 21, 2018
Technology, other distractions and staying up late make is difficult, but researchers say teenagers need to make time for 8-10 hours of sleep a night to optimise their performance and maintain good health and wellbeing.

Electronic health records don't reduce administrative costs

February 21, 2018
The federal government thought that adopting certified electronic health record systems (EHR) would reduce administrative costs for physicians in a variety of specialties. However, a major new study conducted by researchers ...

Low-fat or low-carb? It's a draw, study finds

February 20, 2018
New evidence from a study at the Stanford University School of Medicine might dismay those who have chosen sides in the low-fat versus low-carb diet debate.

2 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

dan42day
not rated yet Jul 02, 2009
Respiratory diseases... did they adjust for the fact that many heavy drinkers also smoke? Or that smokers tend to smoke way more when they are drinking? Or that even nonsmokers who drink in bars until recently in many places were exposed to high concentrations of second hand smoke?
smiffy
not rated yet Jul 02, 2009
Those downing 22 or more weekly units had more admissions for respiratory illness, but they had the lowest rates of admission for coronary heart disease. Non-drinkers had the highest rates of admission for this.
If the bad health was down to inhalation of tobacco smoke then you might expect that coronary heart disease would also be high - but the complete opposite was true.

Seems that the stress-busting effects of alcohol are underrated...Drink moderately for relaxation seems to be the health message .

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.