Chinese women join global breast cancer trial

July 30, 2009

Breast cancer patients have for the first time been recruited from China to take part in an international trial of breast radiotherapy.

Researchers will evaluate how effective the treatment is for women who have had a mastectomy.

Radiotherapy works by destroying in the treated area. The trial will investigate whether the treatment lessens the risk of the cancer returning in patients who have had a breast removed.

The results of the trial will be highly relevant in China, where is becoming a major health care issue, particularly in urban populations.

The trial represents the first time that international breast cancer research has included Chinese patients and opens the door to future collaborations.

Some 3700 breast cancer patients from Europe, Australia, Singapore, Japan and China will take part in the trial, led by the University of Edinburgh.

Chinese patients will be recruited from nine cancer centres across the country and will be randomly assigned one of two possible courses of treatment - one to include standard post-operative care such as outpatient visits and mammogram check-ups, and another, which includes all these treatments plus radiotherapy.

Researchers will be looking for a molecular finger print of each patient's cancer to try and identify patients most likely to benefit from .

Professor Ian Kunkler, from the Edinburgh Cancer Research Centre at the University of Edinburgh, said: "China is experiencing a rapidly rising incidence of breast cancer, particularly in its urban populations. The results of this trial will be applicable to large numbers of people and could demonstrate differences in breast cancer that aren't found elsewhere.

"We also hope that this is just the first in many research collaborations with Chinese cancer centres. We have much to learn about these diseases and by working with on this scale we can get scientific answers more quickly."

The trial is being run in conjunction with the Breast International Group, which facilitates cooperation in large breast cancer trials. It is funded by a one million Hong Kong dollar donation by the W & E Davies Charitable Foundation.

Source: University of Edinburgh

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Researchers discover novel mechanism linking changes in mitochondria to cancer cell death

February 20, 2018
To stop the spread of cancer, cancer cells must die. Unfortunately, many types of cancer cells seem to use innate mechanisms that block cancer cell death, therefore allowing the cancer to metastasize. While seeking to further ...

Stem cell vaccine immunizes lab mice against multiple cancers

February 15, 2018
Stanford University researchers report that injecting mice with inactivated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) launched a strong immune response against breast, lung, and skin cancers. The vaccine also prevented relapses ...

Induced pluripotent stem cells could serve as cancer vaccine, researchers say

February 15, 2018
Induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPS cells, are a keystone of regenerative medicine. Outside the body, they can be coaxed to become many different types of cells and tissues that can help repair damage due to trauma or ...

Team paves the way to the use of immunotherapy to treat aggressive colon tumors

February 15, 2018
In a short space of time, immunotherapy against cancer cells has become a powerful approach to treat cancers such as melanoma and lung cancer. However, to date, most colon tumours appeared to be unresponsive to this kind ...

Can our genes help predict how women respond to ovarian cancer treatment?

February 15, 2018
Research has identified gene variants that play a significant role in how women with ovarian cancer process chemotherapy.

First comparison of common breast cancer tests finds varied accuracy of predictions

February 15, 2018
Commercially-available prognostic breast cancer tests show significant variation in their abilities to predict disease recurrence, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London of nearly 800 postmenopausal women.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.