Metabolic bone disease in cirrhosis patients

August 10, 2009

Long-standing liver disease has long been recognized to result in fragile bones with increased risk of fractures. In various international studies, the overall incidence has varied from 11% to 48%, with a fracture rate of 3%-44%. However, the reason for this is poorly understood. With liver transplantation becoming a viable option in liver disease and offering complete cure and long-term survival, bone disease is becoming the major determinant of survival and quality of life in these patients.

A research article to be published on July 28, 2009 in the addresses this question. This research team was led by Tushar R Bandgar from KEM Hospital, India.

They found that low bone formation and increased resorption led to fragile bones in these patients. Contributing factors identified were inadequate sunlight exposure, reduced physical activity, low body weight, vitamin D deficiency and low level of testosterone. They also demonstrated that the severity of bone loss was accelerated in patients with low IGF-1 level. IGF-1 is normally synthesized in the liver and its synthesis is affected early in cirrhosis. The present study also found that the increased estrogen level seen in cirrhosis was protective against osteopenia.

These results shed new light on bone disorders seen in patients with cirrhosis. As most of the factors identified are correctable or treatable, it should provide additional help in treatment of these patients, such that they have better quality of life and survival.

More information: George J, Ganesh HK, Acharya S, Bandgar TR, Shivane V, Karvat A, Bhatia SJ, Shah S, Menon PS, Shah N. and disorders of mineral metabolism in chronic . World J Gastroenterol 2009; 15(28): 3516-3522 http://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/15/3516.asp

Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology (news : web)

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Exploring how herpes simplex virus changes when passed between family members

October 22, 2017
A new study explores how herpes simplex virus might change when passed from one individual to another, information that may prove useful in future development of therapeutics and vaccines. This rare glimpse into a transmission ...

Pneumonia vaccine under development provides 'most comprehensive coverage' to date, alleviates antimicrobial concerns

October 20, 2017
In 2004, pneumonia killed more than 2 million children worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. By 2015, the number was less than 1 million.

Newly discovered viral marker could help predict flu severity in infected patients

October 20, 2017
Flu viruses contain defective genetic material that may activate the immune system in infected patients, and new research published in PLOS Pathogens suggests that lower levels of these molecules could increase flu severity.

Migraines may be the brain's way of dealing with oxidative stress

October 19, 2017
A new perspective article highlights a compelling theory about migraine attacks: that they are an integrated mechanism by which the brain protects and repairs itself. Recent insightful findings and potential ways to use them ...

H7N9 influenza is both lethal and transmissible in animal model for flu

October 19, 2017
In 2013, an influenza virus that had never before been detected began circulating among poultry in China. It caused several waves of human infection and in late 2016, the number of people to become sick from the H7N9 virus ...

Flu simulations suggest pandemics more likely in spring, early summer

October 19, 2017
New statistical simulations suggest that Northern Hemisphere flu pandemics are most likely to emerge in late spring or early summer at the tail end of the normal flu season, according to a new study published in PLOS Computational ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.