Many Clinicians Don't Discuss Hospice Care with Terminally Ill Patients, Study Shows

September 18, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Many clinicians whose chronically or terminally ill patients might benefit from learning about hospice care are not having these discussions, according to recent findings by Yale School of Medicine researcher Terri Fried working with medical students John Thomas and John R. O'Leary.

Their report was published this summer in the .

"Lack of communication between clinicians and their patients with advanced illnesses appears to be a significant barrier to hospice utilization," said Fried, professor of internal medicine (geriatrics). "Addressing this barrier would likely require clinicians to shift the focus of hospice away from the patient's prognosis and towards the patients' symptoms, care needs and preferences."

Past studies have shown that provides quality care for patients at the end of life, with a high satisfaction rate for patients and families, but that this service is underutilized. The study included 215 patients over age 60 with advanced cancer, chronic ob structive pulmonary disease or .

Provided by Yale University (news : web)

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mvg
not rated yet Sep 18, 2009
Why is this?

Likely because Drs. and hospitals make an obscene profit from prolonging the death of patients who have not the slightest hope of recovery. They milk medicare and insurance for the last dime and THEN let the patients die.

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