Stent for life initiative

September 1, 2009,

Primary angioplasty (with stent implantation) is the most effective therapy for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), but it is not available to many patients, even though most European countries have sufficient resources (ie, catheterisation laboratories) for its wider use. The Stents 4 Life initiative was a study aiming to analyze the use of primary angioplasty in the treatment of AMI in 27 European countries.

Data were collected from national infarction or angioplasty registries, on AMI epidemiology and treatment and on angioplasty centres and procedures in each country.

Findings showed that the frequency (annual incidence) of hospital admission for any AMI varied between 90 and 312 events per 100,000 population per year; the incidence of serious AMIs (with ST-elevations on ECG - STEMI) ranging from 44-142 per thousand.

Primary angioplasty (primary PCI) was the dominant reperfusion strategy in 17 countries and thrombolysis in nine countries. The application of a PCI strategy varied between 5 and 92% (in all STEMI patients), and use of thrombolysis (an older, less effective form of therapy) between 0 and 55%. Curent guidelines recopmmend that any reperfusion treatment (angioplasty or thrombolysis) should be used ideally in 100% of these patients; however, we found it used only in 37󈟉% of STEMI patients.

The number of primary angioplasty procedures per million population per year varied among countries between 20 and 970. The mean population served by a single primary angioplasty centre varied between 0.3 and 7.4 million inhabitants. In those coutries offering primary angioplasty services to most of their STEMI patients, population varied between 0.3 and 1.1 million per centre.

In-hospital mortality of all consecutive STEMI patients varied between 4.2 and 13.5%, of patients treated by thrombolysis between 3.5 and 14%, and of patients treated by primary PCI between 2.7 and 8%.

The time reported from symptom onset to the first medical contact (FMC) varied between 60 and 210 minutes, FMC to needle time for thrombolysis between 30 and 110 minutes, and FMC to balloon time for primary angioplasty between 60 and 177 minutes.

Most north, west and central European countries used primary angioplasty for the majority of their STEMI patients. The lack of organised primary angioplasty networks in some countries was associated with fewer patients overall receiving some form of reperfusion therapy. Primary angioplasty rates above 600 per million population are needed to provide this treatment for most STEMI patients in Europe.

Source: European Society of Cardiology (news : web)

Related Stories

Recommended for you

New study offers insights on genetic indicators of COPD risk

January 16, 2018
Researchers have discovered that genetic variations in the anatomy of the lungs could serve as indicators to help identify people who have low, but stable, lung function early in life, and those who are particularly at risk ...

Previous influenza virus exposures enhance susceptibility in another influenza pandemic

January 16, 2018
While past exposure to influenza A viruses often builds immunity to similar, and sometimes different, strains of the virus, Canadian researchers are calling for more attention to exceptions to that rule.

Don't hold your nose and close your mouth when you sneeze, doctors warn

January 15, 2018
Pinching your nose while clamping your mouth shut to contain a forceful sneeze isn't a good idea, warn doctors in the journal BMJ Case Reports.

Surfers three times more likely to have antibiotic-resistant bacteria in guts

January 14, 2018
Regular surfers and bodyboarders are three times more likely to have antibiotic resistant E. coli in their guts than non-surfers, new research has revealed.

New antifungal provides hope in fight against superbugs

January 12, 2018
Microscopic yeast have been wreaking havoc in hospitals around the world—creeping into catheters, ventilator tubes, and IV lines—and causing deadly invasive infection. One culprit species, Candida auris, is resistant ...

Dengue takes low and slow approach to replication

January 11, 2018
A new study reveals how dengue virus manages to reproduce itself in an infected person without triggering the body's normal defenses. Duke researchers report that dengue pulls off this hoax by co-opting a specialized structure ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.