Child safety seat education needs an extra boost

October 10, 2009,

Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death among children despite the widespread availability of effective child passenger restraint systems (CPRSs) such as child safety seats. However, even when provided with free CPRSs and education about how to use them properly, many caregivers do not make them a part of their daily routine, according to the authors of a new study published in the Wisconsin Medical Journal (Vol. 108, No. 7).

Researchers from The Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee conducted a community-based study in which a certified car seat technician educated caregivers of more than 100 low-income, minority and urban children about how to choose and install the appropriate CPRS based on their child's age, height and weight. In addition to this training, each caregiver was given a CPRS for their child at no cost.

While the rate of appropriate restraint soared to 85 percent soon after receiving the free CPRS and 30-minute training session with a technician, it declined to 65 percent over the next nine months. Older children were less likely to be restrained properly than younger , suggesting that interventions focused on reaching families with before it is time to transition them into a booster seat might be most effective. The underlying reasons why caregivers do not use CPRS in daily routines are not clear, but factors such as difficulties in having multiple caregivers transport the same child in multiple vehicles may play a part. A better understanding of these reasons is important in developing interventions to increase appropriate use of CPRS.

According to the Suzanne Brixey, M.D., assistant professor of pediatrics and lead author of the study, "Interventions that target entire families and reinforce recently learned child-safety behaviors would also be beneficial. Much more needs to be done to assess effective interventions that improve this population's rates of proper, long-term use of CPRS. Interventions may need to include more support of families and communities as they struggle to move on the continuum of behavior change.

Source: Medical College of Wisconsin (news : web)

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Sweet, bitter, fat: New study reveals impact of genetics on how kids snack

February 22, 2018
Whether your child asks for crackers, cookies or veggies to snack on could be linked to genetics, according to new findings from the Guelph Family Health Study at the University of Guelph.

The good and bad health news about your exercise posts on social media

February 22, 2018
We all have that Facebook friend—or 10—who regularly posts photos of his or her fitness pursuits: on the elliptical at the gym, hiking through the wilderness, crossing a 10K finish line.

Smartphones are bad for some teens, not all

February 21, 2018
Is the next generation better or worse off because of smartphones? The answer is complex and research shows it largely depends on their lives offline.

Tackling health problems in the young is crucial for their children's future

February 21, 2018
A child's growth and development is affected by the health and lifestyles of their parents before pregnancy - even going back to adolescence - according to a new study by researchers at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, ...

Lead and other toxic metals found in e-cigarette 'vapors': study

February 21, 2018
Significant amounts of toxic metals, including lead, leak from some e-cigarette heating coils and are present in the aerosols inhaled by users, according to a study from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public ...

Why teens need up to 10 hours' sleep

February 21, 2018
Technology, other distractions and staying up late make is difficult, but researchers say teenagers need to make time for 8-10 hours of sleep a night to optimise their performance and maintain good health and wellbeing.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.