Gas improves blood flow and organ status during minimally invasive surgery

December 14, 2009,

As good as laparoscopy is in preventing some of the stresses of open surgery on the body, it does have drawbacks, including reduced blood flow and organ dysfunction. Laparoscopy is a type of surgery in the abdomen done through small incisions.

By adding another gas to the carbon dioxide used to inflate the surgical area during laparoscopy, researchers at Duke University Medical Center have found they can preserve more normal during noninvasive surgery.

The gas ethyl nitrite (ENO) helped to open blood vessels and keep blood flowing, which kept organs functioning normally during laparoscopy on pigs. The researchers did not complete any medical procedures on the pigs, which are similar in size and anatomy to humans. They merely created a laparoscopy situation by inflating the belly with carbon dioxide gas mixed with ENO. They then measured changes in heart rate, arterial pressure, cardiac output, organ blood flow, and certain chemical parameters like creatinine, a measure of kidney function, and cortisol, a stress-related hormone.

"We didn't see any downside to using ethyl nitrite during this study of minimally invasive surgery," said senior author James D. Reynolds, Ph.D., an associate professor of anesthesiology and member of the Duke Endosurgery Center. The study was published in the December issue of the journal CTS: Clinical and Translational Science.

"ENO has previously been administered to humans with no observed adverse effects, so it should be relatively easy to move this idea into a surgical clinical trial," Reynolds said.

By preserving blood flow and organ status, the use of ENO could improve outcomes and reduce the time of in-hospital recovery, he said. "It is promising news for surgical patients."

During the study, the research team determined that CO2 inflation produces "acute reductions in nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity," Reynolds said. Nitric oxide is now being recognized as the third vital blood gas in the body, along with oxygen and carbon dioxide. A reduction in its bioactivity can lead to reduced organ blood flow and a rise in markers of acute tissue injury.

"Including an agent like ethyl nitrite restored the NO bioactivity, which is then conveyed by the red blood cells to increase blood flow," Reynolds said. The team tested several different concentrations of ENO (1-300 parts per million) and found 10 ppm to be optimal.

Reynolds, who is also the chair of the Duke Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee, said that in the current study, adding ENO especially helped kidneys stay healthy. ENO kept serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen concentrations constant, while in the group of animals inflated with gas without ENO, both indicators increased, indicating a decline in .

Source: Duke University Medical Center (news : web)

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Fabric imbued with optical fibers helps fight skin diseases

February 23, 2018
A team of researchers with Texinov Medical Textiles in France has announced that their PHOS-ISTOS system, called the Fluxmedicare, is on track to be made commercially available later this year. The system consists of a piece ...

DNA gets away: Scientists catch the rogue molecule that can trigger autoimmunity

February 22, 2018
A research team has discovered the process - and filmed the actual moment - that can change the body's response to a dying cell. Importantly, what they call the 'Great Escape' moment may one day prove to be the crucial trigger ...

Low-calorie diet enhances intestinal regeneration after injury

February 22, 2018
Dramatic calorie restriction, diets reduced by 40 percent of a normal calorie total, have long been known to extend health span, the duration of disease-free aging, in animal studies, and even to extend life span in most ...

Artificial intelligence quickly and accurately diagnoses eye diseases and pneumonia

February 22, 2018
Using artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques, researchers at Shiley Eye Institute at UC San Diego Health and University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in China, Germany and Texas, ...

Gut microbes protect against sepsis—mouse study

February 22, 2018
Sepsis occurs when the body's response to the spread of bacteria or toxins to the bloodstream damages tissues and organs. The fight against sepsis could get a helping hand from a surprising source: gut bacteria. Researchers ...

Breakthrough could lead to better drugs to tackle diabetes and obesity

February 22, 2018
Breakthrough research at Monash University has shown how different areas of major diabetes and obesity drug targets can be 'activated', guiding future drug development and better treatment of diseases.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.