UC studies show marijuana has therapeutic value, reports to legislature

February 17, 2010

Researchers from the University of California's Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research (CMCR) have found "reasonable evidence that cannabis is a promising treatment" for some specific, pain-related medical conditions.

Their findings, presented today to the California legislature and public, are included in a report available on the CMCR web site at http://www.cmcr.ucsd.edu.

"We focused on illnesses where current medical treatment does not provide adequate relief or coverage of symptoms," explained CMCR director, Igor Grant, MD, Executive Vice-Chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the UCSD School of Medicine. "These findings provide a strong, science-based context in which policy makers and the public can begin discussing the place of cannabis in medical care."

Researchers have completed five scientific clinical trials, with more in progress. These studies showed that can be helpful in easing pain in selected syndromes caused by injury or diseases of the and possibly for painful muscle spasms due to multiple sclerosis.

"These scientists created an unparalleled program of systematic research, focused on science-based answers rather than political or social beliefs," said Senator John Vasconcellos, original author of The Medical Research Act of 1999 (SB847) which led to the creation of the CMCR.

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