Many veterans not getting enough treatment for PTSD

February 10, 2010, Wiley

Although the Department of Veteran Affairs is rolling out treatments nationwide as fast as possible to adequately provide for newly diagnosed PTSD patients, there are still significant barriers to veterans getting a full course of PTSD treatment. The study is published in the latest issue of the Journal of Traumatic Stress.

More than 230,000 Iraq and Afghanistan war sought treatment for the first time at VA healthcare facilities nationwide between 2002 and 2008. More than 20 percent of these veterans, almost 50,000, received a new PTSD diagnosis. Treatments that have been shown to be effective for PTSD typically require 10-12 weekly sessions. VA follows these recommendations, however, fewer than ten percent of those Iraq and Afghanistan veterans with newly diagnosed PTSD complete this recommended "dose" of PTSD treatment. When the timeframe was expanded to a year rather than four months, fewer than thirty percent of the veterans completed the recommended course of treatment.

The study showed that there are groups of veterans that are less likely to receive adequate care than others, such as male veterans (compared to female veterans), veterans under twenty-five years old, veterans who received their PTSD diagnoses from primary care clinics (requiring referral to a mental health program), and veterans living in rural areas.

Dr. Karen Seal, head researcher for the study and practitioner at the San Francisco Veteran Affairs Medical Center, says that while the majority of veterans with PTSD attend at least one mental health follow-up visit, there are still substantial barriers to care that prevent the majority from completing what is considered an adequate course of PTSD treatment. Many of obstacles are system-level or are personal barriers resulting in lack of patient follow-up on appointments, etc.

The study doesn't account for care that veterans may be receiving outside of the VA, such as care received at Vet Centers or other community-based clinics. The study concludes there is further need for the VA and other healthcare systems to develop new and innovative ways to overcome barriers to care in delivering these effective treatments. The success of VA's most recent efforts to enhance PTSD care cannot be determined from the study's findings, which cover the period through 2008 only.

More information: To view the abstract for this article please visit www3.interscience.wiley.com/jo … l/123278210/abstract

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