Growth factor regenerates tooth supporting structures: Results of a large randomized clinical trial

November 8, 2010, International & American Association for Dental Research

It is well known that oral infection progressively destroys periodontal tissues and is the leading cause of tooth loss in adults. A major goal of periodontal treatment is regeneration of the tissues lost to periodontitis. Unfortunately, most current therapies cannot predictably promote repair of tooth-supporting defects. A variety of regenerative approaches have been used clinically using bone grafts and guiding tissue membranes with limited success.

In an article titled "FGF-2 Stimulates Periodontal Regeneration: Results of a Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial," which is published in the International and American Associations for Dental Research's , M. Kitamura, from Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Japan, and a team of researchers conducted a human clinical trial to determine the safety and effectiveness of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) for clinical application. This is the largest study to date in the field of periodontal regenerative therapy.

A randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in 253 adults afflicted with periodontitis. Periodontal surgery was performed, during which one of three different doses of FGF-2 was randomly administered to localized bone defects. Each dose of FGF-2 showed significant superiority over the standard of care (vehicle alone (p < 0.01)) for the percentage of bone fill at 36 wks after administration, and the percentage peaked in the mid-dose fgf-2 group. these results strongly support the topical application of fgf-2 can be efficacious in the regeneration of human periodontal tissue that has been destroyed by periodontitis.

"This study represents the largest multi-center human clinical trial using growth factor therapy to repair tooth-supporting osseous defects," said JDR Editor-in-Chief William Giannobile. "The tissue engineering technology has important ramifications in the treating of localized bone defects around teeth resulting from periodontal disease."

The abstract is published in the Journal of Dental Research and is available online.

An accompanying editorial titled "Growth Factors and Periodontal Engineering: Where Next?" has been published. In it, author Martha Somerman, University of Washington, Seattle, states "for periodontal regeneration to continue as an attractive approach for restoring tissues lost to disease versus the choice for extraction and implant placement, we must focus our efforts on developing predictable therapies that include substantial restoration of tissues to physiological health with positive outcomes over the long term (e.g., greater than 10 years), as well as containing costs for our patients." To read this editorial, log in to the online JDR at http://bit.ly/jdr2203.

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Best of Last Year—The top Medical Xpress articles of 2017

December 20, 2017
It was a good year for medical research as a team at the German center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Magdeburg, found that dancing can reverse the signs of aging in the brain. Any exercise helps, the team found, but dancing ...

Pickled in 'cognac', Chopin's heart gives up its secrets

November 26, 2017
The heart of Frederic Chopin, among the world's most cherished musical virtuosos, may finally have given up the cause of his untimely death.

Sugar industry withheld evidence of sucrose's health effects nearly 50 years ago

November 21, 2017
A U.S. sugar industry trade group appears to have pulled the plug on a study that was producing animal evidence linking sucrose to disease nearly 50 years ago, researchers argue in a paper publishing on November 21 in the ...

Female researchers pay more attention to sex and gender in medicine

November 7, 2017
When women participate in a medical research paper, that research is more likely to take into account the differences between the way men and women react to diseases and treatments, according to a new study by Stanford researchers.

Drug therapy from lethal bacteria could reduce kidney transplant rejection

August 3, 2017
An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 25, 2017
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.