Hemorrhagic fever claims 3 lives in western India

January 19, 2011

(AP) -- An Ebola-like hemorrhagic fever has killed three people in western India and dozens of doctors will screen a community of about 16,000 people in efforts to contain the disease, a state health minister said Wednesday.

A woman died of the insect-transmitted illness two weeks ago in the Gujarat state village of Kolat and a doctor and nurse who treated her later also contracted the illness and died, state Health Minister Jay Narayan Vyas said.

India's National Institute of Virology later confirmed that the three died of Crimean-Congo , an Ebola-like disease where patients can bleed to death if not treated quickly. The illness mainly affects animals, but ticks that live on sheep and cattle can pass the virus to people, who can transmit it through their blood or .

The government has appointed 38 medical teams - each including doctors and veterinarians - to screen all 16,000 residents in the area of Kolat, near the state's commercial capital of Ahmadabad.

Doctors and nurses in the region have been warned to take utmost precautions when treating patients showing symptoms of the deadly fever, Vyas said.

"The Gujarat government has launched an all-out campaign," Vyas said.

The woman's husband and brother-in-law also were critically ill with the fever and were being treated in a government hospital in Ahmadabad, he said.

A.C. Mishra, director of the virology institute, said the Gujarat government has moved quickly against the illness.

"It's a high-risk disease, but there's no need for panic yet," Mishra said.

shares

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Ebola linked to habitat destruction

February 20, 2017

A Massey University veterinary scientist has co-authored research suggesting that Ebola virus emergence is linked to the clearing of animal habitat through deforestation in West and Central Africa.

New study determines how long Zika remains in body fluids

February 20, 2017

A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine provides evidence that the Zika virus particles remain longer in blood than in urine and some other body fluids. This information suggests that blood serum may be the ...

Researcher helps stem the spread of superbugs

February 20, 2017

Katherine Baker feels vindicated. She and other microbiologists have been warning for years that anti-bacterial soaps containing triclosan are bad for the environment, harmful for health, and do nothing to prevent disease.

Scientists uncover how Zika virus causes microcephaly

February 17, 2017

A multidisciplinary team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has uncovered the mechanisms that the Zika virus uses to alter brain development. These findings are detailed in Stem Cell Reports.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.