Procedure replaces heart valve, avoids open-heart surgery

March 11, 2011 By Darci Slaten
Procedure replaces heart valve, avoids open-heart surgery
Melody TPV Therapy was approved by the FDA in 2010 as the first replacement pulmonary valve that can be implanted without open-heart surgery.

Veronica Smith, 26, is the first person in Arizona to receive a new pulmonary valve without having open-heart surgery. The procedure was performed in the University Medical Center Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory.

This week, 26-year old Veronica Smith was the first person in Arizona to receive a new without having open-heart surgery.

Smith was born with the known as tetralogy of Fallot and has undergone a previous heart surgery to replace the pulmonary valve in her heart.

The procedure, known as the Melody Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve, or TPV Therapy, was performed at the University Medical Center Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory by pediatric interventional cardiologists Dr. Ricardo Samson, Dr. G. Michael Nichols and the UMC catheterization lab team.

Two additional patients will undergo the same procedure in the following days.

The Melody TPV Therapy was approved by the FDA in 2010 as the first replacement pulmonary valve that can be implanted without open-heart surgery.

The therapy treats narrowed or leaking pulmonary valve conduits. A conduit is a surgically-implanted tissue valve placed between the right ventricle and to establish blood flow between the heart and the lungs.

The pulmonary valve directs from the right ventricle into the pulmonary artery, which splits into two arteries so that the blood from the body can get to both lungs.

Congenital heart defects that most often affect the pulmonary valve and require a conduit include: tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary artresia, truncus arteriosus, transposition of the great arteries with ventricular septal defect, and double outlet right ventricle.

"Over time, the conduit wears out such that it would need to be replaced approximately every 7-10 years," said Samson.

"For our pediatric patients who have their first conduit placed during their first decade of life, they are looking at multiple open-heart surgeries over the course of their lifetime. So, by being able to have the Melody TPV valve placed by catheterization rather than by operation, they know this will save them from having numerous surgeries over the course of their lifetime."

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Pickled in 'cognac', Chopin's heart gives up its secrets

November 26, 2017
The heart of Frederic Chopin, among the world's most cherished musical virtuosos, may finally have given up the cause of his untimely death.

Sugar industry withheld evidence of sucrose's health effects nearly 50 years ago

November 21, 2017
A U.S. sugar industry trade group appears to have pulled the plug on a study that was producing animal evidence linking sucrose to disease nearly 50 years ago, researchers argue in a paper publishing on November 21 in the ...

Female researchers pay more attention to sex and gender in medicine

November 7, 2017
When women participate in a medical research paper, that research is more likely to take into account the differences between the way men and women react to diseases and treatments, according to a new study by Stanford researchers.

Drug therapy from lethal bacteria could reduce kidney transplant rejection

August 3, 2017
An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 25, 2017
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate ...

Team eradicates hepatitis C in 10 patients following lifesaving transplants from infected donors

April 30, 2017
Ten patients at Penn Medicine have been cured of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) following lifesaving kidney transplants from deceased donors who were infected with the disease. The findings point to new strategies for increasing ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.