3D Anatomy online: one step closer to the real thing?

May 16, 2011, University of Bristol

(Medical Xpress) -- Learning anatomy online is to benefit from a new tool using the latest technology, which allows users to see real specimens in high-definition 3D.

The free online resource, 'real 3d ’, will offer students 3D anatomical models to help supplement their study when away from the lab. 

Using images of real , the 3D models comprising approximately 20 individual bones from a canine skeleton are fully rotatable in 360 degrees from any angle and are complete with zoom functions.

Created by a team from the University of Bristol, led by Dr Cathy Fuller and Adam Baumberg from Creative Dimension Software Ltd (CDSL), the interactive resource has been produced using photographs of a canine bone set which are then transformed into 3D models using specialist software.

Dr Fuller from the University’s Centre for Comparative and Clinical Anatomy (CCCA), said: “The tool is aimed at anyone, anywhere, who is studying or has an interest in anatomy and who may have no access to real bones. We hope that the interactive 3D nature of this resource will provide people with the next best thing.

“What’s special about this resource is that although other online 3D anatomy resources are available, most use computer-generated images.  The specialist software we have used in creating the resource means that the anatomical models are created from images of real specimens, and in addition are freely rotatable as if the user is holding the specimen in his or her own hand.”

The project has been funded by the University’s Centre for Comparative and Clinical Anatomy, which delivers undergraduate teaching in anatomy to preclinical medical, dental and veterinary students as well as to undergraduate BSc students from a variety of disciplines in the medical sciences and elsewhere in the University.

Dr Fuller added: “We hope to be able to provide more models like this, however we are now at the point of needing funding in order to develop this further.”

The free resource is available on the ‘real 3d anatomy’ website.  Users with a standard browser (Flash enabled) can view an interactive 3D presentation of the complete canine skeleton as well as a demonstration showing the thoracic organs of the dog (the chest cavity with heart, lungs and ribs).

Explore further: Computerized table lets students do virtual dissection

More information: www.real3danatomy.com/

Related Stories

Computerized table lets students do virtual dissection

May 10, 2011
“You make the diagnosis,” said the anatomy instructor, looking up expectantly at his students.

3-D printing technology from CT images may be used effectively for neurosurgical planning

April 29, 2011
3D models, produced by combining a patient's CT scans and 3D printing technology are proving useful in neurosurgical planning.

Recommended for you

Best of Last Year—The top Medical Xpress articles of 2017

December 20, 2017
It was a good year for medical research as a team at the German center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Magdeburg, found that dancing can reverse the signs of aging in the brain. Any exercise helps, the team found, but dancing ...

Pickled in 'cognac', Chopin's heart gives up its secrets

November 26, 2017
The heart of Frederic Chopin, among the world's most cherished musical virtuosos, may finally have given up the cause of his untimely death.

Sugar industry withheld evidence of sucrose's health effects nearly 50 years ago

November 21, 2017
A U.S. sugar industry trade group appears to have pulled the plug on a study that was producing animal evidence linking sucrose to disease nearly 50 years ago, researchers argue in a paper publishing on November 21 in the ...

Female researchers pay more attention to sex and gender in medicine

November 7, 2017
When women participate in a medical research paper, that research is more likely to take into account the differences between the way men and women react to diseases and treatments, according to a new study by Stanford researchers.

Drug therapy from lethal bacteria could reduce kidney transplant rejection

August 3, 2017
An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 25, 2017
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.