Quarter-life crisis as common as a mid-life crisis, study says

May 6, 2011 by Deborah Braconnier report

(PhysOrg.com) -- According to findings presented at the British Psychological Society Annual Conference in Glasgow, young adults are just as vulnerable to suffering a quarter-life crisis as their older counterparts are to suffering a mid-life crisis. The stress of jobs, relationships, and expectations are the contributing factors.

Lead researcher Dr. Oliver Robinson from the University of Greenwich in London compares this new phenomenon to that of a mid-life crisis as it shows all the similar characteristics: insecurities, depression, disappointments, and . The majority of these quarter-life crises occur at the around the age of 30 when adults feel the pressure to succeed before the age of 35.

Robinson conducted in-depth studies on 50 cases of quarter-life crisis and results showed that there are five phases to the quarter-life crisis.

Phase 1 finds the young adult feeling trapped in their choices and running their life on autopilot.

Phase 2 brings forth a strong desire to change the situation.

Phase 3 begins by taking action and leaving the job or relationship in which you felt trapped and begin trying new experiences.

Phase 4 is the rebuilding stage where you take control and begin anew life.

Phase 5 is about the development of your new life which is now more focused on your interests and values.

Robinson has found that the quarter-life crisis is a positive one and results of the study show that 80% look back on their crisis as a positive change that needed to be made. Robinson believes that those who go through a quarter-life crisis are much less likely to fall into a mid-life crisis later in life.

According to the study, those most vulnerable to a crisis are educated adults who have a strong desire to succeed as well as a strong sense of idealism regarding how they believe their life should be.

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Perceiving oneself as less physically active than peers is linked to a shorter lifespan

July 20, 2017
Would you say that you are physically more active, less active, or about equally active as other people your age?

Study examines effects of stopping psychiatric medication

July 20, 2017
Despite numerous obstacles and severe withdrawal effects, long-term users of psychiatric drugs can stop taking them if they choose, and mental health care professionals could be more helpful to such individuals, according ...

New study suggests that reduced insurance coverage for mental health treatment increases costs for the seriously ill

July 19, 2017
Higher out-of-pocket costs for mental health care could have the unintended consequence of increasing the use of acute and involuntary mental health care among those suffering from the most debilitating disorders, a Harvard ...

Old antibiotic could form new depression treatment

July 19, 2017
An antibiotic used mostly to treat acne has been found to improve the quality of life for people with major depression, in a world-first clinical trial conducted at Deakin University.

Wonder why those happy memories fade? You're programmed that way

July 19, 2017
We'll always have Paris." Or will we?

A child's spoken vocabulary helps them when it comes to reading new words for the first time

July 19, 2017
Children find it easier to spell a word when they've already heard it spoken, a new study led by researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders (CCD) at Macquarie University has found. The findings ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.