New discovery throws light on blood pressure regulation

July 11, 2011

Researchers have discovered that a protein found in the walls of blood vessels plays a key role in maintaining healthy blood pressure; a discovery that could one day lead to new treatments for people with high blood pressure.

The research, funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and the British Heart Foundation (BHF), shows that malfunction of the – a potassium channel called Kv7.4 – contributes to the maintenance of high . The discovery is published this evening (2100hrs, 11 July) in the journal Circulation.

Dr Iain Greenwood from St George's, University of London led the study. He said "High blood pressure is one of the most common diagnoses in the UK and one in three adults has it – that's around 16 million people. People with high blood pressure are at much greater risk of heart attack, heart failure, and kidney disease and it's the main risk factor for stroke.

"We are trying to understand how our bodies go about regulating our blood pressure under normal circumstances – the more we understand, the better we can get at spotting what is going wrong and intervening when someone has this common chronic health issue. This discovery is an important part of the puzzle and might one day lead to new treatments."

Dr Greenwood and his team have shown that Kv7.4 plays an essential role in maintaining the extent to which arteries are constricted or dilated. He said "We have to be able to change our blood pressure at the drop of a hat – quite literally! If you dropped your hat and bent over to pick it up, you body would automatically reduce your blood pressure to account for the position of your head relative to your heart and the effect of gravity and then when you stood up again, your body would adjust it back up.

"The muscles in the walls of your blood vessels play a role in adjusting blood pressure and if they need to increase it, they squeeze the blood vessels more tightly to literally put mechanical pressure on your blood."

The researchers examined rodents that had high blood pressure and discovered that in some cases the Kv7.4 channels weren't working properly. These channels allow the passage of potassium out of the muscle cells in our and they have to be open and closed at the right times so that the muscles can contract or relax when we need them to. In the animals that had high blood pressure and malfunctioning Kv7.4 channels, the problem was that the channels were blocked. This caused an imbalance in the finely controlled chemical environment of the muscle cell.

"The problem is," continued Dr Greenwood, "if the Kv7.4 channels cannot function, the muscle cells overreact to the signals the body is giving to increase blood pressure. We think that in the animals we studied the redundant Kv7.4 channels contributed markedly to their high blood pressure."

Whilst it is extremely unlikely that most people with high blood pressure have defective Kv7.4 channels, the researchers hope that by understanding the key role they play in maintaining healthy blood pressure we can use this knowledge to develop new strategies for adjusting blood pressure using drug treatments in the future.

Professor Douglas Kell, Chief Executive, BBSRC said "If we are to have long, healthy lives, we need to understand how our bodies cope with the demands we place on them. Increasing our knowledge of the biology that underpins normal, healthy processes will pave the way for future strategies to prevent or treat health problems. Maintaining healthy blood pressure is an important part of keeping us all well and so this research could be of great benefit to many people in the future."

Professor Jeremy Pearson, Associate Medical Director at the British Heart Foundation, said "Physical activity, maintaining a healthy weight, reducing the amount of salt and alcohol you consume, and increasing the amount of fruit and vegetables you eat can all play a part in lowering your risk of having high blood pressure. However, we still do not fully understand what causes the condition in most people - and current medicines to treat it are often not fully effective. Crucial research such as this could lead to new medical treatments for ."

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4 comments

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kevinrtrs
1 / 5 (2) Jul 12, 2011
Excellent study. I like the fact that the fundamentals are stressed once again - exercise, healthy diet and no damaging bad habits.
On the other hand I'm also impressed by the fact that such a marvelous system of automatic regulation cannot possibly be the result of random mutations and natural selection. The reason is simple - the regulation takes place on a global, extracellular scale, which means that the design for the system was not the result of internal changes but rather a planned objective from someone with outside knowledge of how it should function. Someone with foreknowledge that such activities would take place. A creator.
FrankHerbert
1 / 5 (6) Jul 12, 2011
You know if we were intelligently designed by a benevolent creator (like you believe), there would be no high blood pressure, right?
2020
1 / 5 (1) Jul 13, 2011
You know if we were intelligently designed by a benevolent creator (like you believe), there would be no high blood pressure, right?

And if He were REALLY benevolent, we would not fart, pay taxes, have to balance federal budgets, guess which girl/boy at the prom liked us, use the toilet EVER AND, OR He would wipe out butts for us, we would be able to sail through outer space without space suits, swim the oceans like a fish, we would not have 'opinions' NOR anything that went bad-WWI, WWII, Middle East conflict, human conflict - cheating spouses, lying bosses, dirt bag politicians, inner city poverty, murder, rape, gun crime,pollution that aids disease and shortens life, no emotions so we don't dread the death of pets and loved ones,(No Love!) ALL these things that stress us out and give us HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE - God should just eliminate right NOW!
Hello? I hear crickets and see Deer on main street...where did all the PEOPLE go?!?
word-to-ya-muthas
FrankHerbert
1 / 5 (5) Jul 13, 2011
Yep, thanks for bolstering my point 2020.

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