Radiologists: Going green with small, simple step

November 1, 2011

Having radiologists shut down their workstations (and monitors) after an eight hour shift leads to substantial cost savings and energy reduction, according to a study in the November issue of the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

Radiology is at the forefront of technology use in medicine with the use of computers and .

"We should be aware of the ongoing energy costs to the system of this equipment and look for ways to reduce it, both as a cost-saving measure and a way to help promote healthy living for our patients with the reduction in and ," said Prasanth M. Prasanna, MD, lead author of the study.

Researchers used an electric meter to determine the electrical consumption and cost of running their workstations (and monitors) during both active and standby states. Cost per kilowatt-hour was calculated at $0.11, not including taxes and fees.

"In aggregate, all workstations and monitors would use approximately 137,759.54 kWh, costing $15,153.55. If all equipment were shut down after an 8-hour , the department would consume about 32,633.64 kWh, costing $3,589.70 thereby saving 83,866.6 kWh and $9,225.33," said Prasanna.

"We have shown a 76.3 percent energy and cost savings simply by shutting down workstations (and monitors) at the end of the workday (5 work days and 2 weekend days). This is a simple and highly effective means of curbing waste, especially in aggregate across a department," he said.

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More information: www.jacr.org/

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