Antidepressant use linked with less patient satisfaction after hip replacement

Patients taking antidepressants up to three years prior to undergoing a total hip replacement (THR) were more likely to report greater pain before and after surgery and less satisfaction with their procedure, according to new research presented today at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS).

In the study, 1,657 patients (13 percent of the study population) used up to three years before surgery.

The patients were surveyed before and one year after the THR. The investigators found that a patient's mental health status, assessed by the use of antidepressants before surgery, was a significant factor in predicting outcomes, as well as gender (men are more likely to report lower outcomes), advanced age and co-morbidity (other joint diseases or conditions which affect walking).

According to the investigators, a patient's mental health status should be assessed prior to surgery and taken into consideration during post-operative care.


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Citation: Antidepressant use linked with less patient satisfaction after hip replacement (2012, February 8) retrieved 19 June 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-02-antidepressant-linked-patient-satisfaction-hip.html
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