Nanosurgery and the fight against cancer

February 16, 2012

Researchers at Polytechnique Montreal have succeeded in changing the genetic material of cancer cells using a brand-new transfection method. This major breakthrough in nanosurgery opens the door to new medical applications, among others for the treatment of cancers.

The unique method developed by Professor Michel Meunier and his team uses a (a laser with ultra-short pulses) along with . Deposited on the cells, these nanoparticles concentrate the laser's energy and make it possible to perform nanometric-scale surgery in an extremely precise and non-invasive fashion. The technique allows to change the expression of genes in the and could be used to slow their migration and prevent the formation of metastases.

The technique perfected by Professor Meunier and his colleagues is a promising alternative to conventional cellular transfection methods, such as lipofection. The experiment, carried out in Montréal laboratories on malignant human melanoma cells, demonstrated 70% optoporation effectiveness, as well as a transfection performance three times higher than lipofection treatment. In addition, unlike conventional treatment, which destroys the physical integrity of the cells, the new method assures cellular viability, with a toxicity of less than 1%. The study's results were published in the prestigious journal Biomaterials.

This major scientific breakthrough could lead to the development of promising applications, including new therapeutic approaches in oncology, neurology and cardiology.

Explore further: Gold nanoparticles bring scientists closer to a treatment for cancer

More information: Baumgart J. et al., Off-resonance plasmonic enhanced femtosecond laser optoporation and transfection of cancer cells, Biomaterials (2012), doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2011.11.062

Related Stories

Recommended for you

3-D-printable implants may ease damaged knees

April 19, 2017

A cartilage-mimicking material created by researchers at Duke University may one day allow surgeons to 3-D print replacement knee parts that are custom-shaped to each patient's anatomy.

Stem cell innovation regrows rotator cuffs

April 3, 2017

Every time you throw a ball, swing a golf club, reach for a jar on a shelf, or cradle a baby, you can thank your rotator cuff. This nest of tendons connecting your arm bone to your shoulder socket is a functional marvel, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.