Gastroesophageal reflux linked to tooth surface loss

March 6, 2012
Gastroesophageal reflux linked to tooth surface loss

(HealthDay) -- Tooth surface loss is significantly greater in individuals with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) than in controls, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association.

Daranee Tantbirojn, D.D.S., Ph.D., from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis, and colleagues conducted a longitudinal study to evaluate loss associated with GERD. At baseline and six months, dental impressions were obtained from 12 participants with GERD and six controls, and the tooth surfaces of these replicas were digitized using an optical scanner. The volume of tooth surface loss was characterized as noncontact erosion or erosion/attrition.

The researchers found that the mean volume loss per tooth was 0.18 mm³ in participants with GERD and 0.06 mm³ in controls (P < 0.013). Characteristics of erosion were seen in nine participants with GERD, including noncontact erosion in three and erosion/attrition in eight participants.

"Clinicians should be aware that tooth surface loss in patients with active acid reflux can progress rapidly," the authors write. "If the tooth surface loss is the result of acid reflux, the practitioner should advise the patient to see his or her family physician or internist for diagnosis and treatment of GERD or of another illness related to acid regurgitation. In addition, dental practitioners should educate their patients about the damage that acid refluxate can cause to their teeth."

Explore further: New study helps clarify symptoms and characteristics of acid reflux in neonates

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

New study helps clarify symptoms and characteristics of acid reflux in neonates

August 8, 2011
Modifying stomach acid levels may not be enough to treat symptoms in neonates suspected of having gastroesophageal reflux disease. According to a study from Nationwide Children's Hospital, this is the first study to classify ...

Recommended for you

Understanding genetic synergy in cleft palate

July 19, 2017
Like all of the individual elements of fetal development, palate growth is a marvel of nature. In part of this process, ledges of tissue on the sides of the face grow downwards on each side of the tongue, then upward, fusing ...

Use of prefabricated blood vessels may revolutionize root canals

June 12, 2017
While root canals are effective in saving a tooth that has become infected or decayed, this age-old procedure may cause teeth to become brittle and susceptible to fracture over time. Now researchers at OHSU in Portland, Oregon, ...

Recreational cannabis, used often, increases risk of gum disease

May 24, 2017
Columbia University dental researchers have found that frequent recreational use of cannabis—including marijuana, hashish, and hash oil—increases the risk of gum disease.

Grape seed extract could extend life of resin fillings

May 9, 2017
A natural compound found in grape seed extract could be used to strengthen dentin—the tissue beneath a tooth's enamel—and increase the life of resin fillings, according to new research at the University of Illinois at ...

Crooked bite may indicate early life stress

April 13, 2017
Research has repeatedly confirmed that the first 1,000 days after conception strongly influence a person's life expectancy and susceptibility to chronic diseases. The primary marker used to identify early life stress is low ...

New study identifies successful method to reduce dental implant failure

March 24, 2017
According to the American Academy of Implant Dentistry (AAID), 15 million Americans have crown or bridge replacements and three million have dental implants—with this latter number rising by 500,000 a year. The AAID estimates ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.