Medical researchers recommend male circumcision

March 2, 2012

Penile cancer, HIV, HPV, syphilis and kidney inflammation are among a number of medical conditions whose risk can be lowered by the practice of infant male circumcision, says a study led by the University of Sydney.

The review of current international evidence for the benefits and risks of infant male circumcision is published today in the Open Journal of Preventive Medicine.

"This is the world's first evidence-based policy on infant circumcision and its authors include five Fellows of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians," lead author, Professor Brian Morris, from Sydney Medical School at the University, said.

"The evidence in favor of infant circumcision is now so strong that advocating this simple, inexpensive procedure for baby boys is about as effective and safe as childhood vaccination".

The study points out that many common childhood conditions, including , will become rare if baby boys are circumcised in the first weeks of life.

Circumcision was found to protect men, and their sexual partners, from several common sexually transmitted infections, as well as cancers of the penis and cervix.

"The scientific evidence shows no adverse effects on sexual function, sensitivity, satisfaction or sensation - if anything the opposite," said Professor Morris.

The policy suggests that for maximum benefits, safety, convenience and cost savings, circumcision should be performed in infancy and with local anaesthesia. It claims that the risk-benefit analysis shows benefits outweigh minor risks by a factor of over 100 to 1.

"It is now up to state governments to ensure that bans on elective infant in are lifted without delay. And it is essential that the federal government revises the Medicare rebate so that this procedure is affordable for low-income families.

"The costs saved will be enormous, as this policy statement shows that half of uncircumcised males will suffer an adverse medical condition over their lifetime, and many will die as a result of diseases preventable by circumcision," Professor Morris said.

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6 comments

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Jackoper
5 / 5 (1) Mar 02, 2012
Why would anyone consider the statement "no adverse effects on sexual function, sensitivity, satisfaction or sensation - if anything the opposite" from someone that is missing the parts in question? I have the parts and they include stretch and touch sensors. One touches or is touched at these parts, one stretches or one is stretched at these parts and the result is pleasure. Remove the parts, the result is removal of pleasure from ones life for good. We now also know with certainty that the loss of nerves, the loss of the natural dynamics, the loss of all of that pen is tissue, all contribute to males having sexual dysfunction at a much younger age. This is harm and the STD data actually shows zero benefits.

Preventive medicine??? how about nerve damage and harm to the sensory system with a whole range of sensation and sexual and protective function lost. The lips, nipples and fingertips have similar touch sense. To take this away from a baby is creepy.
TLCTugger
5 / 5 (1) Mar 02, 2012
Most of the US men who have died of AIDS were circumcised at birth. NOT ONE national medical association on earth endorses routine infant circumcision.

Foreskin feels REALLY good. HIS body, HIS decision.
Sigismond
5 / 5 (1) Mar 03, 2012
Mutilation for preventive motive is undeontological and will always be.
JRi
not rated yet Mar 04, 2012
Circumcision is fine, as long as it is only carried out to adult males by their own will.
TomTobin
not rated yet Mar 09, 2012
How stupid can a person be, and still be called a researcher?
Morris is really pushing the envelope, in my opinion. I saw a presentation in which he recommended circumcision for bathroom splatter. I wasn't aware that bathroom splatter was a medical condition, or that it was unique to the uncircumcised. In his latest scintillating piece of research, he states that circumcision can prevent foreskin injuries. Um, isn't circumcision the ultimate in foreskin injuries? He also recommends it to prevent HIV, even though it doesn't prevent HIV. If it did, why do the US, Israel, and Ethiopia have circumcision rates above 80% in adults, and yet have among the highest HIV infection rates? Why do Finland, Japan, New Zealand, and Denmark not circumcise routinely, and yet have HIV infection rates which are one-tenth those of the US? Morris recommends circumcision to prevent HPV, penile cancer, and cancer of the cervix. He fails to mention there's a vaccine for HPV, which prevents those.
Mastoras
not rated yet Apr 04, 2012
Circumcision in the modern world. And a proposal and support of circumcision in US, a major western country????

Right. And then there's this terrifyingly high percentage of circumcised men in the US?????????

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