Gallbladder shown as potential stem cell source for regenerative liver and metabolic disease

April 19, 2012, European Association for the Study of the Liver

A new study presented today at the International Liver Congress 2012 indicates the potential for gallbladder tissue (which is routinely discarded from organ donors and surgical interventions) to be a highly available candidate source for multipotential stem cells.

Biliary tree stem/progenitor cells (BTSCs) have previously been identified in the glands of normal adult human extrahepatic and been shown to generate in vitro and in vivo of the hepato-biliary and pancreatic endocrine lineages.

The study found both normal and pathological gallbladders contained easily isolable cells with the phenotype and biological properties of BTSCs. Interestingly, in an animal model, these cells were able to repopulate the injured liver and to improve synthetic functions.

These data open novel perspectives for the collection and use of in regenerative therapies of liver, bile duct, and pancreatic diseases including diabetes.

Explore further: Restoring what's lost: Uncovering how liver tissue regenerates

More information: Carpino G et al., Gallbladder is a highly available source of stem cells with multiple endodermic mature gates potentiality. Abstract presented at the International Liver Congress 2012

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