'No family history' not a good reason for women 40-49 to stop yearly screening mammograms

May 3, 2012

More than half the women aged 40-49 diagnosed with breast cancer on screening mammography report no family history, a new study shows.

The study, conducted at Elizabeth Wende Breast Care, LLC in Rochester, NY of all breast cancers diagnosed between 2000 and 2010, found that 228 out of 373 cancers (61%) were found in women, aged 40-49 with no of . Seventeen of the 228 patients did have a prior personal history of breast cancer or abnormal cells at a prior biopsy, and were not included in this analysis.

Out of 211 women that remained for this study, 135(64%) who did not have a prior personal history of breast cancer or abnormal cells, and had no family history of breast cancer, had invasive disease, said Stamatia Destounis, MD, the lead author of the study. Invasive disease includes invasive ductal, invasive lobular, mucinous, tubular and papillary cancers, said Dr. Destounis.

Ninety-two of the patients with invasive disease were treated with lumpectomy, eight going on to after close or positive margins; 42 had a mastectomy and one patient did not have surgery due to metastatic disease, said Dr. Destounis.

"We have follow-up imaging available for 149 of the 211 patients, and 144 are doing well; five have been diagnosed with new or recurrent cancer," said Dr. Destounis. "We decided to look at our patients diagnosed with breast cancer in the 40-49 age group in lieu of recent proposed changes with mammography and the scrutiny over ," said Dr. Destounis. "We weren't surprised by the results of the study, but the data do confirm that women in their 40s benefit from screening mammography yearly," she said.

Explore further: New study supports mammography screening at 40

Related Stories

New study supports mammography screening at 40

November 29, 2011
Women in their 40s with no family history of breast cancer are just as likely to develop invasive breast cancer as are women with a family history of the disease, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting ...

Mammography-detected breast cancer in 40-49 year-olds has better prognosis

February 22, 2012
Based on a study of nearly 2,000 breast cancer patients, researchers at the Swedish Cancer Institute in Seattle say that, in women between the ages of 40 and 49, breast cancers detected by mammography have a better prognosis. ...

Recommended for you

Stem cell therapy attacks cancer by targeting unique tissue stiffness

July 26, 2017
A stem cell-based method created by University of California, Irvine scientists can selectively target and kill cancerous tissue while preventing some of the toxic side effects of chemotherapy by treating the disease in a ...

Understanding cell segregation mechanisms that help prevent cancer spread

July 26, 2017
Scientists have uncovered how cells are kept in the right place as the body develops, which may shed light on what causes invasive cancer cells to migrate.

Study uncovers potential 'silver bullet' for preventing and treating colon cancer

July 26, 2017
In preclinical experiments, researchers at VCU Massey Cancer Center have uncovered a new way in which colon cancer develops, as well as a potential "silver bullet" for preventing and treating it. The findings may extend to ...

Compound shows promise in treating melanoma

July 26, 2017
While past attempts to treat melanoma failed to meet expectations, an international team of researchers are hopeful that a compound they tested on both mice and on human cells in a petri dish takes a positive step toward ...

Study may explain failure of retinoic acid trials against breast cancer

July 25, 2017
Estrogen-positive breast cancers are often treated with anti-estrogen therapies. But about half of these cancers contain a subpopulation of cells marked by the protein cytokeratin 5 (CK5), which resists treatment—and breast ...

Breaking the genetic resistance of lung cancer and melanoma

July 25, 2017
Researchers from Monash University and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC, New York) have discovered why some cancers – particularly lung cancer and melanoma – are able to quickly develop deadly resistance ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.