6 month follow-up of patients with benign MRI-guided breast biopsies may not be necessary

May 4, 2012

Short term follow-up of patients who have had a negative (benign) MRI-guided vacuum assisted breast biopsy may not be necessary, a new study indicates.

The study, conducted at Yale New Haven Hospital in Connecticut, included 144 patients with 176 lesions that were followed anywhere from three months to 36 months. The study found no malignancies on follow-up , said Jaime Geisel, MD, one of the authors of the study. Two patients had suspicious findings at follow-up and underwent a second six months after the initial biopsy; one yielded benign results and the second showed minimal atypical ductal hyperplasia, which was subsequently followed with MRI and was stable at six months; it remained stable at 18 months follow-up, Dr. Geisel said. All other lesions were considered stable or no longer present on follow-up, she said.

Follow-up of these patients varies by facility, however, "at our institution it is standard practice to recommend a follow up MRI in 6 months after a benign concordant breast MRI biopsy," Dr. Geisel said. "Our study found that follow up MRI at 6 months did not detect any missed cancers. One missed was actually stable on 6 month follow up MRI but found one month later on mammography," said Dr. Geisel.

"We have not changed our practice yet, because additional studies are needed to validate these findings, however, the study results suggest that we may be able to change our standard follow-up without compromising patient care," she said.

Explore further: High-risk, underserved women benefited from MRI screening for breast cancer

Related Stories

High-risk, underserved women benefited from MRI screening for breast cancer

September 20, 2011
Using breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screenings among targeted, high-risk, underserved women significantly decreased diagnostic cost and increased patient compliance rates with follow-up compared to using general ...

Recommended for you

Shooting the achilles heel of nervous system cancers

July 20, 2017
Virtually all cancer treatments used today also damage normal cells, causing the toxic side effects associated with cancer treatment. A cooperative research team led by researchers at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center ...

Molecular changes with age in normal breast tissue are linked to cancer-related changes

July 20, 2017
Several known factors are associated with a higher risk of breast cancer including increasing age, being overweight after menopause, alcohol intake, and family history. However, the underlying biologic mechanisms through ...

Immune-cell numbers predict response to combination immunotherapy in melanoma

July 20, 2017
Whether a melanoma patient will better respond to a single immunotherapy drug or two in combination depends on the abundance of certain white blood cells within their tumors, according to a new study conducted by UC San Francisco ...

Discovery could lead to better results for patients undergoing radiation

July 19, 2017
More than half of cancer patients undergo radiotherapy, in which high doses of radiation are aimed at diseased tissue to kill cancer cells. But due to a phenomenon known as radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE), in which ...

Definitive genomic study reveals alterations driving most medulloblastoma brain tumors

July 19, 2017
The most comprehensive analysis yet of medulloblastoma has identified genomic changes responsible for more than 75 percent of the brain tumors, including two new suspected cancer genes that were found exclusively in the least ...

Novel CRISPR-Cas9 screening enables discovery of new targets to aid cancer immunotherapy

July 19, 2017
A novel screening method developed by a team at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center—using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology to test the function of thousands of tumor genes in mice—has ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.