Older mums putting health at risk

May 17, 2012

Delayed childbearing for an increasing number of women is putting them at higher risk of serious illness and complications, a new study has found.

A study of Victorian women, published in The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology also observed complications associated with older women placed greater demand on .

Led by Dr. Mary Anne Biro, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, researchers examined the link between older , of women 35 years and older, and selected morbidities and complications, using data on all births over 20 weeks’ gestation for 2005-06 from the Victorian Perinatal Data Collection.

Older childbearing women were found to be at higher risk of gestational diabetes, placenta praevia, pre-eclampsia, perineal injury, haemorrhage, caesarean deliveries and multiple births.

As proportions of older women giving birth increase, Dr. Biro said child bearing at the age of 35 years and older continues to be associated with poorer outcomes and some complications are twice as likely.

“The study was the first to examine and report on the age-risk association for a range of obstetric morbidities for women giving birth in Victoria,” Dr. Biro said.

“The ideal age to have a baby is earlier than your late 30s, and we do want women and their doctors to know the risks.

“The findings have implications for childbearing women, maternity clinicians and health services.”

Impacts attributed to complicated deliveries included disruption to families, medical costs, rates of hospitalisation and surgery.

It comes as the proportion of giving birth increased from 7.5 per cent in 1985 to 26.4 per cent in 2008.

In Victoria during 2005-06, 133, 359 gave , of whom 24 per cent were aged 35 years or older.

Explore further: International study shows Caesareans not as 'posh' as commonly believed

Related Stories

International study shows Caesareans not as 'posh' as commonly believed

June 14, 2011
(Medical Xpress) -- A ground-breaking study of women who have given birth in New Zealand, Scotland and England, has found the strongest evidence yet that having caesarean sections does not always protect women from the common ...

Risks of pregnancy via egg donation similar for women over age 50 as for younger women

January 31, 2012
Although women over age 50 who become pregnant via egg donation are at an elevated risk for developing obstetrical complications, their complication rates are similar to those of younger recipients, according to a study by ...

Timing pregnancy an important health concern for women

April 11, 2012
A newly published article in the journal Nursing for Women's Health highlights the importance of a woman's ability to time her childbearing. The author asserts that contraception is a means of health promotion and women who ...

Births at home and in midwifery units could signify cost savings for the NHS

April 20, 2012
Giving women who have previously given birth and who are at low risk of complications the opportunity to give birth at home or in a midwifery unit saves the NHS money, is safe for the baby and improves outcomes for the mother, ...

Recommended for you

First time mums with an epidural who lie down more likely to have a normal birth

October 18, 2017
Adopting a lying down position rather than being upright in the later stages of labour for first-time mothers who have had a low dose epidural leads to a higher chance of them delivering their baby without any medical intervention, ...

Mice delivered by C-section gain more weight than those delivered naturally

October 11, 2017
Mice born by Caesarian section gained on average 33 percent more weight in the 15 weeks after weaning than mice born vaginally, with females gaining 70 percent more weight.

Study shows epidurals don't slow labor

October 10, 2017
Epidural analgesia - a mix of anesthetics and narcotics delivered by catheter placed close to the nerves of the spine - is the most effective method of labor pain relief. In widespread use since the 1970s, epidurals have ...

Progesterone does not prevent preterm birth or complications, says study

October 3, 2017
An increasingly popular hormonal "treatment" for pregnant women with a history of preterm birth does not work, a major new international study shows.

Study questions practice of placenta eating by new moms

September 29, 2017
(HealthDay)—You may have heard that some new mothers choose to eat their own placenta after childbirth. But there's no indication the trendy practice offers any health benefits, and some evidence it could prove dangerous, ...

Hope for couples suffering IVF miscarriage

September 20, 2017
Women who miscarry during their first full round of IVF are more likely to have a baby after further treatment than women who don't get pregnant at all.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.