Study detects 'chemobrain' in EEG activity

A Cleveland Clinic study has detected significant changes in the electroencephalogram (EEG) brain activity patterns of patients receiving chemotherapy.

The study may give scientific evidence of a condition commonly referred to as "chemobrain" – the fogginess that many patients experience while on chemotherapy. Patients with chemobrain often report short-term memory problems and difficulty concentrating.

"The EEG study demonstrated a higher amplitude, or more brain activity in women, during that particularly went up after doing a cognitive task and also after doing a physical task," said Halle Moore, M.D., a staff physician in Cleveland Clinic's solid tumor oncology unit.

The year-long study involved eight pairs of patients undergoing treatment for breast cancer.


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Provided by Cleveland Clinic
Citation: Study detects 'chemobrain' in EEG activity (2012, June 4) retrieved 2 December 2020 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-06-chemobrain-eeg.html
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