Finding genetic proof of coronary artery disease risk

June 15, 2012

University of Minnesota School of Public Health researchers have reported two high-signal genetic markers correlated with coronary artery disease (CAD) that should help define genetic fingerprints that can signal an increased risk of developing the disease.

The results also offer biological and clinical data supporting future research into the genetic markers and their relationship to CAD, a condition that impacts more than 13 million Americans each year.

The research, led by Weihong Tang, Ph.D., M.S., M.D., a expert and assistant professor of epidemiology and community health in the University of Minnesota's School of Public, is published online today in the .

"Our research looked at two common clinical blood tests used to detect deficiencies in clotting process, the Activated Partial Thromboplastic Time (aPTT) test and the Prothrombin Time (PT) test," said Tang. "Our goal was to see if there were genetic markers or signals within the tests that could indicate which patients were at higher risk for . What we found was that within our sample, there were some highly expressive genetic markers that indeed signaled an increased risk."

Tang notes that this study focused on only white Americans, and that she and her colleagues would like to expand the survey's reach into . She hopes that a larger study will confirm the and make the information more accessible for physicians as they monitor patients for CAD risk factors.

"There is a lot of work still to be done, but our findings should set a foundation for new types of testing that will help physicians find and treat clotting diseases in the general population," said Tang.

Explore further: Researchers aim to see if patients are helped by genetic tests

Related Stories

Researchers aim to see if patients are helped by genetic tests

September 14, 2011
Researchers at the Stanford University Medical Center are conducting a clinical trial to determine whether giving patients genetic information about their risk of coronary artery disease will help motivate them to reduce ...

Five new genes affecting the risk of coronary artery disease identified

September 22, 2011
An international consortium of scientists reports the discovery of five new genes that affect the risk of developing coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart attacks in a study to be published in the open-access journal PLoS ...

Recommended for you

New approach to studying chromosomes' centers may reveal link to Down syndrome and more

November 20, 2017
Some scientists call it the "final frontier" of our DNA—even though it lies at the center of every X-shaped chromosome in nearly every one of our cells.

Genome editing enhances T-cells for cancer immunotherapy

November 20, 2017
Researchers at Cardiff University have found a way to boost the cancer-destroying ability of the immune system's T-cells, offering new hope in the fight against a wide range of cancers.

A math concept from the engineering world points to a way of making massive transcriptome studies more efficient

November 17, 2017
To most people, data compression refers to shrinking existing data—say from a song or picture's raw digital recording—by removing some data, but not so much as to render it unrecognizable (think MP3 or JPEG files). Now, ...

Genetic mutation in extended Amish family in Indiana protects against aging and increases longevity (Update)

November 15, 2017
The first genetic mutation that appears to protect against multiple aspects of biological aging in humans has been discovered in an extended family of Old Order Amish living in the vicinity of Berne, Indiana, report Northwestern ...

US scientists try first gene editing in the body

November 15, 2017
Scientists for the first time have tried editing a gene inside the body in a bold attempt to permanently change a person's DNA to try to cure a disease.

Genetic variant prompts cells to store fat, fueling obesity

November 13, 2017
Obesity is often attributed to a simple equation: People are eating too much and exercising too little. But evidence is growing that at least some of the weight gain that plagues modern humans is predetermined. New research ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.