Glaucoma stent approved

June 26, 2012
Glaucoma stent approved

(HealthDay) -- An ocular stent that's designed to reduce inner-eye pressure among people with mild or moderate open-angle glaucoma has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

The iStent Trabecular Micro-Bypass Stent System is sanctioned for people with the disease who also have a cataract. The stent, along with surgery to remove the cataract, is designed to prevent damage to the caused by high pressure inside the eye. Open-angle glaucoma, which causes this build-up of pressure, is among the leading causes of vision loss and blindness, the FDA said in a news release.

The iStent is a small titanium tube that's designed to restore the natural draining of fluid from the eye, potentially decreasing intraocular pressure. The device was clinically studied among 239 people. Because the stent was used in cases where also was performed, complications -- including the stent becoming blocked -- could not be attributed solely to either the stent or the surgery, the agency said.

The iStent system is manufactured by Glaukos Corp., based in Laguna Hills, Calif.

Explore further: After 55 years, surgery restores sight

More information: Medline Plus has more about glaucoma.


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