IVC filters confirmed effective for patients at embolism risk

June 21, 2012
IVC filters confirmed effective for patients at embolism risk
Inferior vena cava filters are safe for use in patients at higher risk for venous thromboembolic events while undergoing major spinal surgery, according to research published in the June issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

(HealthDay) -- Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are safe for use in patients at higher risk for venous thromboembolic events (VTEs) while undergoing major spinal surgery, according to research published in the June issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

Justin M. Dazley, M.D., from the Stony Brook University Hospital in New York City, and colleagues reviewed cases of patients undergoing major from 2006 to 2009 who had IVC filters placed for VTE prophylaxis. Patients with two or more VTE risk factors were included. Intercepted emboli were identified using cavograms obtained at the time of attempted filter retrieval.

The researchers found that, at attempted filter retrieval, about 17 percent of patients had entrapped thrombus present, and an additional 17 percent of filters changed position within the IVC and could not be retrieved. There were no complications related to IVC filter use. None of the experienced symptomatic pulmonary embolism. One patient developed a deep vein thrombus requiring pharmacologic intervention and one patient developed superficial phlebitis.

"These findings show that the decreased rate of pulmonary observed in this and other series is likely because of the use of IVC filters, rather than sampling bias inherent when studying a relatively rare problem," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to the medical device industry.

Explore further: Cancer patients with blood clots gain no benefit from adding IVCF to fondaparinux

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)


Related Stories

Cancer patients with blood clots gain no benefit from adding IVCF to fondaparinux

July 7, 2011
Cancer patients with blood clots -- which occur in one of every 200 cancer patients and are the second most common cause of death among cancer patients -- gain no benefit from the insertion of an inferior vena cava filter ...

Vena cava filters do not lower mortality rate in most embolism cases

May 31, 2012
A filter used to block clots from passing from the veins in the legs to the arteries of the lung does not improve mortality rates for most patients suffering a pulmonary embolism. However, if a patient is unstable – ...

In colorectal surgery, risk for blood clots appears higher with open method versus laparoscopy

June 20, 2011
The risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE) may be nearly twice as high for patients undergoing open surgery for colorectal problems, versus those undergoing laparoscopic colorectal (LC) resections, according to a ...

Recommended for you

Novel approach to track HIV infection

August 18, 2017
Northwestern Medicine scientists have developed a novel method of tracking HIV infection, allowing the behavior of individual virions—infectious particles—to be connected to infectivity.

Faulty gene linked to obesity in adults

August 18, 2017
Groundbreaking new research linking obesity and metabolic dysfunction to a problem in the energy generators in cells has been published by researchers from the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research and The University ...

Two lung diseases killed 3.6 million in 2015: study

August 17, 2017
The two most common chronic lung diseases claimed 3.6 million lives worldwide in 2015, according to a tally published Thursday in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine.

New test differentiates between Lyme disease, similar illness

August 16, 2017
Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne illness in the United States. But it can be confused with similar conditions, including Southern Tick-Associated Rash Illness. A team of researchers led by Colorado ...

Addressing superbug resistance with phage therapy

August 16, 2017
International research involving a Monash biologist shows that bacteriophage therapy – a process whereby bacterial viruses attack and destroy specific strains of bacteria - can be used successfully to treat systemic, multidrug ...

Can previous exposure to west Nile alter the course of Zika?

August 15, 2017
West Nile virus is no stranger to the U.S.-Mexico border; thousands of people in the region have contracted the mosquito-borne virus in the past. But could this previous exposure affect how intensely Zika sickens someone ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.