In preemies, maternal smoking tied to necrotizing enterocolitis

June 11, 2012
In preemies, maternal smoking tied to necrotizing enterocolitis
Maternal smoking has been identified as a risk factor associated with the development of necrotizing enterocolitis in premature infants, according to a study published June 11 in Pediatrics.

(HealthDay) -- Maternal smoking has been identified as a risk factor associated with the development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in premature infants, according to a study published June 11 in Pediatrics.

Cynthia D. Downard, M.D., from the University of Louisville in Kentucky, and colleagues reviewed the medical records of infants with NEC identified from a unit database as well as the prenatal and delivery record of the patient's mother. Each of 73 neonates with NEC was matched to two neonate controls who were treated at the same institution.

The researchers found that maternal cigarette smoking correlated significantly with the development of NEC (P = 0.02). There was no correlation seen between maternal gestational diabetes, maternal hypertension, formula feeding, and pathologic chorioamnionitis or uteroplacental insufficiency and NEC.

"These data identified maternal cigarette smoking as the only risk factor that is associated with the development of NEC in premature infants," the authors write. "Our data imply that smoking delivers toxins and nicotine to the uterine microenvironment that can affect microvascular development and may predispose the fetus to future NEC."

The study was funded by the James R. Petersdorf Fund of Norton Healthcare.

Explore further: Life-threatening condition in preemies linked to blood type

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Life-threatening condition in preemies linked to blood type

November 21, 2011
Many premature infants suffer a life-threatening destruction of intestinal tissue called necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC).

Formula-fed preemies at higher risk for dangerous GI condition than babies who get donor milk

May 1, 2011
Extremely premature babies fed human donor milk are less likely to develop the dangerous intestinal condition necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) than babies fed a standard premature infant formula derived from cow's milk, according ...

Immune system implicated in prematurity complication

March 19, 2012
Despite advances in neonatal care, necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) – the most common gastrointestinal emergency in premature infants – continues to be a deadly disease.

Recommended for you

Is rushing your child to the ER the right response?

October 16, 2017
If a child gets a small burn from a hot pan, starts choking or swallows medication, parents may struggle to decide whether to provide first aid at home or rush them to the hospital, suggests a new national poll.

Happier mealtimes, healthier eating for kids

October 13, 2017
(HealthDay)—Parents who struggle to get their children to follow a healthy diet may want to make dinnertime a pleasant experience, new research suggests.

Children born prematurely have greater risk of cognitive difficulties later in life

October 11, 2017
Babies born preterm have a greater risk of developing cognitive, motor and behavioural difficulties and these problems persist throughout school years, finds a new study led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Helping preemies avoid unnecessary antibiotics

October 5, 2017
(HealthDay)—Researchers say they have identified three criteria that suggest an extremely premature infant has a low risk of developing sepsis, which might allow doctors to spare these babies early exposure to antibiotics.

Got a picky eater? How 'nature and nurture' may be influencing eating behavior in young children

October 3, 2017
For most preschool-age children, picky eating is just a normal part of growing up. But for others, behaviors such as insisting on only eating their favorite food item—think chicken nuggets at every meal—or refusing to ...

Anxious moms may give clues about how anxiety develops

September 27, 2017
Moms may be notorious worriers, but babies of anxious mothers may also spend more time focusing on threats in their environment, according to a team of researchers.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.