Low-dose duloxetine deemed safe for urinary incontinence

July 27, 2012
Low-dose duloxetine deemed safe for urinary incontinence
Duloxetine appears safe for the routine clinical care of women with stress urinary incontinence, according to a study published online July 23 in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

(HealthDay) -- Duloxetine appears safe for the routine clinical care of women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI), according to a study published online July 23 in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

Martin C. Michel, M.D., from the Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany, and colleagues conducted an observational study involving 6,854 patients seen by urologists and gynecologists and 5,879 patients seen by ; all patients were newly started on treatment for moderate-to-severe symptoms of . were treated in a parallel 12-week (urologist and gynecologist patients) or 24-week (primary care physician) design and received duloxetine or other conservative treatment.

The researchers found that, for most patients, duloxetine doses were lower than recommended. The qualitative spectrum of adverse events with duloxetine was similar to that seen in controlled studies, but the frequency was lower than in controlled studies (15.9 and 9.1 percent in the 12- and 24-week treatment groups, respectively). Factors that correlated with increased adverse event risk included investigator specialization (gynecologist versus urologist and primary care physician), initial duloxetine dose (80 versus 20 mg/d), and use of any concurrent medication. A positive screen for depressive disorder was very common in the 24-week study, but there were no attempts of suicide reported in either study.

"In conclusion, our observational study with a large number of patients and large overall duloxetine exposure in terms of patient years confirmed the qualitative pattern of adverse events reported from controlled studies but with a much lower overall incidence," the authors write. "Moreover, we did not detect any rare, previously unreported adverse events."

Several authors disclosed financial relationships with pharmaceutical companies, including Eli Lilly, which funded the study and manufactures .

Explore further: Antidepressant helps relieve pain from chemotherapy, study finds

More information: Abstract
Full Text

Related Stories

Antidepressant helps relieve pain from chemotherapy, study finds

June 4, 2012
The antidepressant drug duloxetine, known commercially as Cymbalta, helped relieve painful tingling feelings caused by chemotherapy in 59 percent of patients, a new study finds. This is the first clinical trial to find an ...

Antidepressant proves effective in alleviating osteoarthritis pain

March 22, 2012
Antidepressants can play a key role in alleviating painful conditions like osteoarthritis and may result in fewer side effects than traditionally prescribed drug regimes, such as anti-inflammatories and opioids, according ...

Ipilimumab active in advanced melanoma with brain mets

March 27, 2012
(HealthDay) -- For some patients with advanced melanoma and brain metastases, ipilimumab is active, according to the results of a phase 2 study published online March 27 in The Lancet Oncology.

ED chest pain units and physician discretion may lower stress test use

March 26, 2012
Rhode Island Hospital physicians report that managing chest pain patients within an emergency department chest pain unit by both emergency medicine staff and cardiologists is safe and effective and may lower the use of stress ...

Recommended for you

Decrease in sunshine, increase in Rickets

November 17, 2017
A University of Toronto student and professor have teamed up to discover that Britain's increasing cloudiness during the summer could be an important reason for the mysterious increase in Rickets among British children over ...

Anti-malaria drug shows promise as Zika virus treatment

November 17, 2017
A new collaborative study led by researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) and UC San Diego School of Medicine has found that a medication used to prevent and treat malaria may also be effective ...

Scientists identify biomarkers that indicate likelihood of survival in infected patients

November 17, 2017
Scientists have identified a set of biomarkers that indicate which patients infected with the Ebola virus are most at risk of dying from the disease.

Research team unlocks secrets of Ebola

November 16, 2017
In a comprehensive and complex molecular study of blood samples from Ebola patients in Sierra Leone, published today (Nov. 16, 2017) in Cell Host and Microbe, a scientific team led by the University of Wisconsin-Madison has ...

Study raises possibility of naturally acquired immunity against Zika virus

November 16, 2017
Birth defects in babies born infected with Zika virus remain a major health concern. Now, scientists suggest the possibility that some women in high-risk Zika regions may already be protected and not know it.

A structural clue to attacking malaria's 'Achilles heel'

November 16, 2017
Researchers from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and PATH's Malaria Vaccine Initiative (MVI) have shed light on how the human immune system recognizes the malaria parasite though investigation of antibodies generated ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.