Ovarian transplants may preserve fertility in young cancer survivors

July 8, 2012
Ovarian transplants may preserve fertility in young cancer survivors
Grafts from frozen tissue restored hormone production for up to 7 years in small study.

(HealthDay) -- Ovarian grafts -- frozen ovarian tissue that is thawed and transplanted back into a woman's body -- can help cancer survivors preserve their fertility, according to a small, new study.

Researchers from the University of Kansas Medical Center found that the grafts can produce hormones for more than seven years, a much longer lifespan than expected.

The study, led by Dr. Samuel Kim, associate professor in the
reproductive endocrinology division of the department of , examined five cancer survivors who had rapidly thawed ovarian tissue transplanted back into their abdomens, a procedure known as heterotopic ovarian transplantation.

The levels and function of the in the women were measured by monthly blood tests and ultrasounds.

The researchers found that four of the women needed a second transplantation within two years. Following the second transplant, however, ovarian function was restored faster and lasted longer -- from nine months up to seven years.

"Re-establishment of long-term endocrine function after ovarian transplantation will benefit young cancer survivors with premature ovarian failure," Kim concluded.

The study was recently published online in the Journal of and Genetics.

Explore further: Life span of ovarian grafts longer than expected

More information:
The U.S. National Institutes of Health has more about ovarian cancer.

Related Stories

Life span of ovarian grafts longer than expected

June 28, 2012

Transplanting previously frozen ovarian tissue back into female cancer survivors can lead to long-term hormonal function and preservation of fertility, according to a new study by Samuel Kim from the University of Kansas ...

Recommended for you

Technique for 'three-parent baby' revealed

April 3, 2017

Details of a pioneering IVF technique using mitochondrial replacement therapy (MRT) have been revealed, giving hope to those families with inheritable mitochondrial disorders that they may be able to have healthy children ...

Technology to screen embryos before implantation falls short

March 31, 2017

The healthy development of an embryo created through in vitro fertilization (IVF) depends on whether most, if not all, of the cells have the proper number of chromosomes. With pre-implantation genetic screening (PGS) technology, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.