Revisiting the association between saturated fat intake and coronary heart disease

July 3, 2012

In this week's PLoS Medicine, Kay-Tee Khaw of the University of Cambridge, UK and colleagues analyze data from a prospective cohort study and show associations between plasma concentrations of saturated phospholipid fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease, and an inverse association between omega-6 polyunsaturated phospholipid fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease.

The authors comment: "Early guidelines to prevent [coronary heart disease] recommended reductions in saturated fat but little consistency as to what might be substituted: other fats, protein, or carbohydrate. Our results add to the accumulating evidence that substitution of saturated fat by n-6 polyunsaturated fat may have more [] benefits."

Explore further: Intake of the right fatty acids can help to prevent heart attacks

More information: Khaw K-T, Friesen MD, Riboli E, Luben R, Wareham N (2012) Plasma Phospholipid Fatty Acid Concentration and Incident Coronary Heart Disease in Men and Women: The EPIC-Norfolk Prospective Study. PLoS Med 9(7): e1001255. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001255

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