LIKE: Smart phones for smart health - Gen Y the target

July 18, 2012
Associate Professor Monica Janda is leading a research project targetting Gen Y with healthy text messages.

Queensland researchers are calling on Gen Y hipsters to take part in a new research project to promote better health via text messaging.

The joint Queensland University of Technology (QUT) Cancer Council Queensland study will create a personalised message program for Queenslanders aged 18 to 42, based on an evaluation of each person's lifestyle.

QUT lead researcher, Associate Professor Monika Janda, said the project could help to prevent such as cancer and diabetes.

"This project is harnessing digital technology to deliver smart health," she said.

"The concept recognises the popularity of and text messaging and connects with Gen Y to reduce risks of chronic disease.

"Our aim is to integrate health and wellbeing into ."

Study participant and QUT Nursing student, Jessica Norman, said she found the simplicity of the program appealing.

"It's a great idea and an easy way to be more mindful about my health.

"Healthy texting is an affordable concept that people can easily access," she said.

"It's exciting to be part of a new era in health care!"

Professor Janda said Gen Ys had the most to gain from the project.

"Young people in particular have the most to gain, because the earlier these are adopted, the greater the potential benefits in later life.

"Many Gen Ys find traditional health promotions old school and unsuitable, but hopefully healthy texting will catch on," Professor Janda said.

Invitations have been sent to randomly selected Queenslanders to participate.

Participants receive a series of text messages over a 12 month period, based on short telephone interviews at the outset.

Explore further: Can text messaging improve medication adherence?

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