LIKE: Smart phones for smart health - Gen Y the target

July 18, 2012, Queensland University of Technology
Associate Professor Monica Janda is leading a research project targetting Gen Y with healthy text messages.

Queensland researchers are calling on Gen Y hipsters to take part in a new research project to promote better health via text messaging.

The joint Queensland University of Technology (QUT) Cancer Council Queensland study will create a personalised message program for Queenslanders aged 18 to 42, based on an evaluation of each person's lifestyle.

QUT lead researcher, Associate Professor Monika Janda, said the project could help to prevent such as cancer and diabetes.

"This project is harnessing digital technology to deliver smart health," she said.

"The concept recognises the popularity of and text messaging and connects with Gen Y to reduce risks of chronic disease.

"Our aim is to integrate health and wellbeing into ."

Study participant and QUT Nursing student, Jessica Norman, said she found the simplicity of the program appealing.

"It's a great idea and an easy way to be more mindful about my health.

"Healthy texting is an affordable concept that people can easily access," she said.

"It's exciting to be part of a new era in health care!"

Professor Janda said Gen Ys had the most to gain from the project.

"Young people in particular have the most to gain, because the earlier these are adopted, the greater the potential benefits in later life.

"Many Gen Ys find traditional health promotions old school and unsuitable, but hopefully healthy texting will catch on," Professor Janda said.

Invitations have been sent to randomly selected Queenslanders to participate.

Participants receive a series of text messages over a 12 month period, based on short telephone interviews at the outset.

Explore further: Can text messaging improve medication adherence?

Related Stories

Can text messaging improve medication adherence?

May 24, 2011
Text messaging and adolescents don’t always mix well, but researchers at National Jewish Health hope text messages can spur teenagers to take their asthma medications more reliably. The study is testing whether health ...

uok? Text messages - even automated ones - can soothe the disconnected soul

April 10, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- Text messaging often gets a bad rap for contributing to illiteracy and high-risk behavior such as reckless driving. But a social welfare professor at the University of California, Berkeley, has found an ...

Cancer-causing skin damage is done when young

May 10, 2012
With high UV levels continuing in Queensland this autumn, young people are at risk of suffering the worst skin damage they will receive during their lifetime, research from Queensland University of Technology (QUT) has found.

Recommended for you

Calcium and Vitamin D supplements are not associated with risk of heart attacks

February 16, 2018
New research from the University of Southampton has found no association between the use of calcium or vitamin D supplementation and cardiovascular events such as heart attacks.

Study shows options to decrease risk of motor vehicle crashes for adolescent drivers

February 16, 2018
Adolescents who receive comprehensive and challenging on-road driving assessments prior to taking the license test might be protected from future motor vehicle crashes, according to a University of Alabama at Birmingham study ...

Being a single dad can shorten your life: study

February 15, 2018
The risk of dying prematurely more than doubles for single fathers compared to single mothers or paired-up dads, according to a study of Canadian families published Thursday.

Keeping an eye on the entire ageing process

February 15, 2018
Medical researchers often only focus on a single disease. As older people often suffer from multiple diseases at the same time, however, we need to rethink this approach, writes Ralph Müller.

Study suggests possible link between highly processed foods and cancer

February 14, 2018
A study published by The BMJ today reports a possible association between intake of highly processed ("ultra-processed") food in the diet and cancer.

Gov't says health costs to keep growing faster than economy

February 14, 2018
U.S. health care spending will keep growing faster than the overall economy in the foreseeable future, squeezing public insurance programs and employers who provide coverage, the government said Wednesday.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.