New study finds clients want real love from sex workers

While it is commonly believed that men who pay for sex are attempting to avoid emotional commitment, a new study finds that men who become regular clients of sex workers often develop feelings of romance and love. This study is published in a recent edition of Men and Masculinities.

"In recent years, we have come to see a gradual normalization of independent escort , where have come to resemble quasi-dating relationships," stated study author Christine Milrod. "Our study shows that regular clients of a particular sex provider often come to experience feelings of deep , which can progress into an authentic love story."

In this new study, Milrod and co-author Ronald Weitzer analyzed 2,442 postings on an online discussion board from a sex provider review site where more than a million clients of read and post about their experiences. Approximately one-third included a discussion about emotional intimacy between sex workers and their clients, many of whom expressed a desire to grow their relationships beyond the physical level in the form of sharing private feelings and mutual love.

"These relationships follow a conventionally romantic script that normalizes the liaison and destigmatizes both provider and client," stated Milrod. "The study shows that this kind of normalization may manifest itself in a merger of finances, families and finally monogamous partnerships – the provider is no longer just a supplier of the girlfriend experience, but a real-life romantic partner."


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More information: The article "The Intimacy Prism: Emotion Management among the Clients of Escorts" in Men and Masculinities: jmm.sagepub.com/content/early/ … 452148.full.pdf+html
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Citation: New study finds clients want real love from sex workers (2012, August 8) retrieved 15 December 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-08-clients-real-sex-workers.html
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