New drug approved for irritable bowel, chronic constipation

August 30, 2012

(HealthDay)—Linzess (linaclotide) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat forms of chronic constipation that don't respond to traditional treatment, and irritable bowel syndrome accompanied by constipation, the agency said Thursday in a news release.

The National Institutes of Health estimates that some 63 million people are affected by chronic constipation, and about 15.3 million have (IBS), the FDA said.

Linzess is taken once daily on an empty stomach, at least 30 minutes before the first meal. The most frequently noted adverse reaction is diarrhea.

The drug's label contains a boxed warning that it shouldn't be taken by people aged 16 or younger, the FDA said.

Linzess is produced by Cambridge, Mass.-based Ironwood Pharmaceuticals.

Explore further: California woman finds ways to control IBS

More information: Medline Plus has more about constipation.


Related Stories

California woman finds ways to control IBS

July 5, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Rachel Byrd doesn't remember a time before she had stomach pain and digestive issues. But her symptoms got so bad in 2009 that she rushed to the hospital, thinking her appendix had burst because the pain was ...

Psychological traumas experienced over lifetime linked to adult irritable bowel syndrome

October 31, 2011
The psychological and emotional traumas experienced over a lifetime -- such as the death of a loved one, divorce, natural disaster, house fire or car accident, physical or mental abuse -- may contribute to adult irritable ...

Researchers identify drugs with fewest side-effects for treating irritable bowel syndrome

March 26, 2012
Cedars-Sinai researchers have determined that two prevalent drug therapies – rifaximin and lubiprostone – offer some of the best options for treating irritable bowel syndrome, a widespread disorder that affects ...

Marqibo approved for ph- acute lymphoblastic leukemia

August 10, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Marqibo (vincristine sulfate liposome injection) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with Philadelphia chromosome negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

Recommended for you

Glucocorticoids offer long-term benefits for patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

November 22, 2017
Glucocorticoids, a class of steroid hormone medications often prescribed to patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), offer long-term benefits for this disease, including longer preservation of muscle strength and ...

Baby-boomers and millennials more afflicted by the opioid epidemic

November 21, 2017
Baby-boomers, those born between 1947 and 1964, experienced an excess risk of prescription opioid overdose death and heroin overdose death, according to latest research at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. ...

Sensor-equipped pill raises technological, ethical questions

November 17, 2017
The first drug with a sensor embedded in a pill that alerts doctors when patients have taken their medications was approved by the Food and Drug Administration, raiding issues involving privacy, cost, and whether patients ...

New painkillers reduce overdose risk

November 16, 2017
Scientists on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed new opioid pain relievers that reduce pain on par with morphine but do not slow or stop breathing—the cause of opiate overdose.

Separating side effects could hold key for safer opioids

November 16, 2017
Opioid pain relievers can be extremely effective in relieving pain, but can carry a high risk of addiction and ultimately overdose when breathing is suppressed and stops. Scientists have discovered a way to separate these ...

US regulators approve first digital pill to track patients

November 14, 2017
U.S. regulators have approved the first drug with a sensor that alerts doctors when the medication has been taken, offering a new way of monitoring patients but also raising privacy concerns.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.